Territory in eastern South America, ruled since 1988 by the República Federativa do Brasil
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  • FreedomPedia
  • Brazil (Portuguese: Brasil), officially the Federative Republic of Brazil (Portuguese: República Federativa do Brasil), is the largest country in both South America and Latin America. As the world's fifth-largest country by both area and population, it is the largest country to have Portuguese as an official language and the only one in the Americas. Bounded by the Atlantic Ocean on the east, Brazil has a coastline of 7,491 km. It borders all other South American countries except Ecuador and Chile and covers 47.3% of the continent's land area. Its Amazon River basin includes a vast tropical forest, home to diverse wildlife, a variety of ecological systems and extensive natural resources spanning numerous protected habitats. This unique environmental heritage makes Brazil one of 17 megadiverse countries and is the subject of significant global interest and debate regarding deforestation and environmental protection.

    Conferences and Conventions

    Instituto de Estudos Empresariais, XVII Liberty Forum - Forum da Liberdade, in Porto Alegre, from 5 Apr to 6 Apr 2004

    Measures of Freedom

    Brazil | Freedom House, Freedom in the World 2016: Anxious Dictators, Wavering Democracies: Global Freedom under Pressure
    2016: Status: Free, Aggregate Score: 81, Political Rights: 2, Civil Liberties: 2
    "Rising inflation, Brazil's worst economic recession in 25 years, and allegations of official corruption battered President Dilma Rousseff's administration in 2015, leading to large but mostly peaceful protests and sustained public pressure for the president to resign less than a year into her second term. Opposition parties requested her impeachment over revelations that she had manipulated the government's accounts to disguise deficit spending, and the impeachment process was expected to begin in early 2016."
    Human Freedom Index, The Human Freedom Index 2016: A Global Measurement of Personal, Civil, and Economic Freedom
    2014: 6.81, Rank: 82, Personal Freedom: 7.35, Economic Freedom: 6.27, Democracy Index: 6.94
    Level of Economic Freedom, Economic Freedom of the World: 2016 Annual Report
    2014: 6.27, Rank: 124

    Articles

    A Libertarian Visits South America, by Jacob G. Hornberger, Future of Freedom, Mar 1999
    Relates Hornberger's trip to visit the Instituto de Estudos Empresariais in Brazil and the Fundación Atlas para una Sociedad Libre in Argentina
    "He was an ardent defender of the so-called rights to health care, education, housing, and other aspects of the socialistic welfare state. I first pointed out that the root cause of Brazil's economic problems was the fact that the government was constitutionally required to provide all of these 'benefits' to the citizenry. In order to alleviate the plight of the Brazilian people, I said, it is necessary to amend its constitution to prohibit the government from 'assisting' the citizenry in this way."
    Better Them Than Us, by Scott McPherson, 19 Jan 2004
    Discusses the Brazilian disarmament statute of 2003 and similar 1997 United Kingdom ban vis-à-vis findings by Gary Kleck and John Lott regarding gun ownership and prevalence of crime
    "Hoping to curb a homicide rate that puts Brazil's violent death rate above every other nation not at war, President da Silva signed the aptly termed 'disarmament act' during the Christmas week. The new law limits the carrying of handguns in public to police officers, the military, licensed security guards, and hunters; requires a background check for gun purchases; and raises the minimum age for gun ownership from 21 to 25."
    Farm Subsidies Must Go, by Sheldon Richman, 30 Apr 2004
    Discusses the response to a World Trade Organization ruling that U.S. subsidies to cotton farmers violate WTO rules
    "... at last year's WTO meeting in Cancun, Mexico, Brazil and other developing countries tried to start a discussion about farm subsidies in the rich countries. They got nowhere, so they walked out and brought the meeting to a halt. ... We can't know what the world supply and price of cotton would be without the subsidies. If they were ended tomorrow and the price rose, as the Brazilians maintain it would, we could expect the higher price to summon forth additional cotton from somewhere. So the Brazilians might be no better off."
    Related Topic: Farming
    Improve the CIA? Better to abolish it, by Chalmers Johnson, San Francisco Chronicle, 22 Feb 2004
    Lists countries where the CIA conducted subversive operations and recommends abolishing the agency.
    "Since the overthrow of the Iranian government in 1953, the CIA has engaged in similar disguised assaults on the governments of Guatemala (1954); the Congo (1960); Cuba (1961); Brazil (1964); Indonesia (1965); Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia (1961-73); Greece (1967); Chile (1973); Afghanistan (1979 to the present); El Salvador, Guatemala and Nicaragua (1980s); and Iraq (1991 to the present) -- to name only the most obvious cases."
    The Global Education Industry: Lessons from Private Education in Developing Countries, by Antony Flew, The Freeman, Sep 2000
    Reviews the book The Global Education Industry by James Tooley
    "In Brazil, for instance, there are seven or eight large chains of private schools, several of which also run universities and sometimes educational television stations. Not only is the private sector large in Brazil, but it is also strikingly innovative. The most dramatic example of this is provided by the COC chain."
    Related Topics: Educational Freedom, India
    The Secret State, by Carl Oglesby, 19 Dec 1991
    Details various events from the establishment of the Gehlen Org after World War II to the 1991 death of Danny Casolaro that Oglesby says led to the creation of "a national-security oligarchy, a secret and invisible state within the public state"
    "1964: Brazil. Two weeks after the Johnson administration announced the end of the JFK Alliance for Progress with its commitment to the principle of not aiding tyrants, the CIA staged and the U.S. Navy supported a coup d'etat in Brazil over-throwing the democratically elected Joao Goulart. Within twenty-four hours a new right-wing government was installed, congratulated and recognized by the United States."

    The introductory paragraph uses material from a Wikipedia article, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.