Advocates absolute liberty in thought and action while respecting others' rights
See also:
  • FreedomPedia
  • Libertarianism (Latin: liber, "free") is a political philosophy that upholds liberty as its principal objective. Libertarians seek to maximize autonomy and freedom of choice, emphasizing political freedom, voluntary association and the primacy of individual judgment.

    • Agorism - Libertarian strategy proposed by Samuel E. Konkin III that strives to achieve a voluntary society via non-political means
    • Anarcho-Capitalism - Political theory that rejects governmental authority and advocates laissez-faire capitalism
    • Non-aggression Principle - The libertarian principle that no person should initiate force against another
    • Voluntaryism - Libertarian philosophy that advocates non-political strategies to delegitimize the State

    Web Sites

    Libertarian Hall of Fame
    This was a project (no longer in place) to create both an online hall of fame as well as a physical museum "to honor those who, throughout history, fought for individual liberty against tyranny in all its forms" [was hosted at libertarianhalloffame.org]
    "Our committee has nominated the following persons ... John Locke, George Mason, H.L. Mencken, Albert Jay Nock, Thomas Paine, Ludwig von Mises, Murray N. Rothbard, Thomas Szasz, Robert Heinlein, Ayn Rand, Harry Browne, Hugo Grotius, Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, Victor Hugo, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Tolstoy, Karl Hess, Lord Acton, Frederic Bastiat, John Bright, Frank Chodorov, Richard Cobden, Henry Hazlitt, Patrick Henry, Thomas Jefferson, Rose Wilder Lane, Lao Tzu, Robert LeFevre, Isabel Paterson, Leonard Read, Algernon Sidney, Herbert Spencer, Lysander Spooner, John Stossel, Milton Friedman, Mark Twain, Grover Cleveland, John Trenchard, Thomas Gordon, 'Tank man', Martin Van Buren, Henry David Thoreau, Sophie Scholl"
    Libertarianism.org | Exploring the theory and history of liberty, by Cato Institute
    Sections include: Explore (columns, essays, external resources and media), Guides (self-paced courses), Podcasts and Books
    "Many people believe that liberty is the core political value of modern civilization itself, the one that gives substance and form to all the other values of social life. They're called libertarians."

    Web Pages

    The Advocates for Self-Government Libertarian Celebrities, by Advocates for Self-Government
    List and short profiles of famous or notable libertarian or libertarian-leaning individuals
    The Advocates for Self-Government LIBERTARIANISM 101, by Advocates for Self-Government
    Originally a standalone website, now part of TheAdvocates.org; includes introductory video by Marshall Fritz, definitions of libertarian by notable individuals, frequently asked questions and lists of organizations, publications, websites and celebrities

    Blogs

    The Libertarian Standard: Property - Prosperity - Peace
    Group blog of mostly Austrian and Rothbardian-influenced libertarians (appears to be inactive since January 2015)

    Articles

    Clint Eastwood announces: I'm a "libertarian", Libertarian Party News, 18 Feb 1997
    Libertarian Party press release based on Eastwood's response to a Playboy interview question: "How would you characterize yourself politically?"
    "Eastwood joins a growing number of individuals in the entertainment industry who have identified themselves as libertarians. Included on that list are TV star John Laroquette, humorist Dave Barry, author P.J. O'Rourke, movie actor Russell Means, magician Jillette Penn, author Camille Paglia, TV reporter John Stossell, and comedian Dennis Miller."
    Do You Consider Yourself a Libertarian?, by Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr., 25 May 2007
    Interview by Kenny Johnsson for "The Liberal Post" blog
    "... I think we have to be happy with the term libertarian, while knowing that politics tends to taint all word usage issues. What is a libertarian? It is a person who believes in the absolute right of private property ownership. All else follows from that one proposition."
    Free-Market Socialism, by Sheldon Richman, 14 Nov 2014
    Counters the caricature of libertarians as hyperindividualists and explains the benefits that could be gained from truly freed markets
    "Nothing about libertarianism commits its adherents to what critics call 'atomistic individualism.' That would be a curious descriptor for people who love the ideas of trade and the division of labor, even among perfect strangers at great distances. ... Libertarians, to the extent that they grasp the fundamentals of their philosophy, care about social dynamics, which accounts for their fascination with economics, especially the Austrian school."
    Related Topic: Free Market
    Give Them Libertarianism, and a Moving Van: For 4,800 people seeking a bastion of hands-off rule, the most alluring state has the motto 'Live Free or Die', by Seth Stern, The Christian Science Monitor, 17 Oct 2003
    Describes the beginnings of the Free State Project, shortly after New Hampshire was selected as the destination state
    "It wasn't just the cheap rent and quiet living that convinced Justin Somma to move ... to the southwestern corner of New Hampshire last month. Equally appealing to this libertarian-minded 20-something is his new state's lack of an income tax or even a motorcycle-helmet law. ... Maine, Vermont, and New Hampshire share the 'live and let live' attitude that puts privacy first in social policies such as gay rights or abortion, says Dartmouth College professor Richard Winters."
    How I Became a Libertarian, by Mary J. Ruwart, 14 Dec 2002
    Part of Walter Block's autobiography series; Dr. Ruwart recounts some key moments in her path to libertarianism and anarchism, from Swamp Fox to Atlas Shrugged to Morris and Linda Tannehill
    "Raised as a Catholic, I could not reconcile the concept of ending tax-supported welfare with Christ's admonition to love our neighbors. In considering this dilemma, I suddenly became aware of a pivotal point: although refusing to help others might not be very loving, pointing guns at our neighbors to force them to help those in need was even less so."
    How I Became a Libertarian and an Austrian Economist, by Richard M. Ebeling, 2 May 2016
    Autobiographical essay highlighting the people and events who influenced him in his path to libertarianism and Austrian economics
    "I suppose I can date my interest in both libertarianism and Austrian Economics from the day I was born. The doctor grabbed me by my little feet, turned me upside down and spanked my tiny bottom. I began to cry out. ... I appreciated that what the doctor had done was in violation of the 'non-aggression' principle. The rest is history. Well . . . maybe not quite. ... But [Murray Rothbard] was the radical libertarian – 'Mr. Libertarian' as some came to call him – the master system-builder of a 'science of liberty' based on the 'natural rights' of individuals to freedom on Aristotelian philosophical foundations. "
    I Can't Help That I'm a Libertarian, by Sheldon Richman, 1 Aug 2014
    Excellent essay on why libertarians hold their beliefs and why they can't be sitlent about them
    "My understanding of what it means to be human, of the conditions under which reason-bearing, language-using social animals can flourish, of the nature of violence, and of the essence of the state all lead me to conclude that individuals should be free of aggression, essentially the initiation of physical force. And that means all persons should be unmolested as they peacefully go about their lives, formulating plans and aspirations, justly acquiring possessions ..., and engaging in voluntary cooperation — such as trade — with other persons."
    Related Topic: War
    In Praise of "Thick" Libertarianism , by Sheldon Richman, 4 Apr 2014
    Examines "thin" and "thick" libertarianism, explaining how being noncomittal about racism undermines the principle of non-initiation of force
    "The freedom philosophy is intimately related to ethical, political, and methodological individualism. ... So I'm puzzled by the pushback whenever someone explicitly associates the libertarian philosophy with values like tolerance and inclusion. We don't care only about force and its improper uses. We care about individual persons."
    Libertarian Class Analysis, by Sheldon Richman, Future of Freedom, Jun 2006
    Examines the class analysis by Charles Comte, Charles Dunoyer, and Augustin Thierry
    "Who were the exploiters? All who lived forcibly off of the industrious classes. ... Thus political and economic history is the record of conflict between producers, no matter their station, and the parasitic political classes, both inside and outside the formal state. Or to use terms of a later subscriber to this view, John Bright, it was a clash between the tax-payers and tax-eaters."
    Libertarianism: Left or Right?, by Sheldon Richman, Future of Freedom, Jun 2007
    Makes the case that libertarianism is properly on the Left of the polical spectrum
    "Left and Right did not refer merely to which side of the assembly one sat on or one's attitude toward the regime. ... The Left understood that historically the state was the most powerful engine of exploitation ... Libertarians also showed their Left colors by opposing imperialism, war, and the accompanying violations of civil liberties ..."
    Related Topic: Murray N. Rothbard
    Libertarianism: The Moral and the Practical , by Sheldon Richman, Future of Freedom, May 2014
    Explores whether libertarian policies ought to be based on moral or practical bases
    "... we must inquire whether libertarian concerns are really divisible into, on the one hand, a concern with duties (deontology), for example, respecting individual rights, and on the other, a concern with practical consequences. ... I'm hardly alone in my uneasiness with this separation of concerns into the moral and the practical. In my camp is no less a personage than Adam Smith."
    Libertarianism and the Great Divide, by Justin Raimondo, 16 Mar 2007
    Review of Brian Doherty's Radicals for Capitalism
    "Most interestingly, Radicals for Capitalism chronicles the forgotten organizational history of the libertarian movement, the early institutional pillars of what was to become a widely-known addition to the American political lexicon. ... The libertarian insight expressed so succinctly by Randolph Bourne – 'War is the health of the State' – has never been more relevant ..."
    Libertarianism and the War, by Justin Raimondo, 2 Apr 2007
    Criticises a Cato Unbound sympsium titled "Libertarianism: Past and Prospects" with contributed essays from Brian Doherty, Brink Lindsey, Tyler Cowen, Tom G. Palmer and Virginia Postrel
    "... libertarianism, i.e., the philosophy that government is invariably a malevolent force in human history, is anti-imperialism. Opposition to war lies at the very core of the libertarian argument. ... Libertarianism has a long and glorious tradition, not the least of which is the principled anti-imperialist legacy of Leonard Read, Frank Chodorov, Murray Rothbard, and a long list of others."
    Libertarianism Is Not Atheist, Is Not Religious, by Wendy McElroy, The Daily Bell, 9 Oct 2014
    Examines Rothbard's responses to Rand's atheistic views that influenced early modern libertarianism
    "Thus, libertarianism is a commitment to eschew aggressive force; it is not a specific lifestyle because lifestyles result from the many peaceful choices people make after eschewing force. What a peaceful person chooses to do may be of great moral importance. ... Past the point of eschewing violence, however, his behavior is irrelevant to the question of libertarianism."
    Related Topics: Ayn Rand, Murray N. Rothbard
    Libertarianism Is the Key to Our Future, by Jacob G. Hornberger, Future of Freedom, Jul 2006
    Examines three reasons (freedom, morality and pragmatism) that suggest that Americans will eventually return to their libertarian heritage
    "Libertarianism, not socialism or interventionism, is the cornerstone of our nation's heritage of freedom. Libertarianism succeeds in producing rising standards of living, nurtures voluntary charity, and promotes harmonies among people. It is a philosophy grounded in the moral foundations of freedom. Libertarianism is the key to the future of our nation."
    Libertarianism Rightly Conceived, by Sheldon Richman, 2 May 2014
    Responds to certain criticisms made about Richman's "What Social Animals Owe to Each Other"
    "The debate on thick and thin libertarianism continues, and that's a good thing. Libertarians can only gain by the discussion. ... [Lew] Rockwell need not lose sleep worrying that these libertarians might choose some other value over other people's freedom. No one understands better than they that no rational value can be achieved by violating individuals' rights."
    Libertarian moment or movement?, by Drs. Michael A. Glueck & Robert J. Cihak, 24 Jan 2003
    Two months before the 2003 Iraq invasion, presents the views of Robert Higgs and David Theroux as to whether the libertarian movement can have "a major role to play in post-9/11 America"
    "But the libertarian movement at its best has functioned as an incubator of ideas that, one way or another, find their themselves in the political mainstream. So far, their best work has been in economics and law. But there's no inherent reason why, sooner or later, the libertarian critique of the welfare/warfare state, and their perspective on the perils of the 21st century, shouldn't enter the realm of the commonly known."
    Libertarians of Will, Intellect, and Action, by Murray N. Rothbard, 1977
    Keynote address to the Libertarian Party Convention
    "To be truly 'born again,' the libertarian must experience what we might call a second baptism, the 'baptism of will.' ... In short, the truly complete libertarian, the 'born again' libertarian, if you will, is not content with recognizing the truth of liberty as the best social system; he cannot and will not rest content until that system, that set of principles, has triumphed in the world of reality."
    Meeting Murray Rothbard On the Road to Libertarianism, by Jeff Riggenbach, 4 Jan 2003
    Riggenbach recounts his path from an advocate of Ayn Rand's objectivism, later reading LeFevre and attending his lectures to reading Rothbard's "The Anatomy of the State" and eventually meeting and being able to have many conversations with him
    "I took my first steps down the road to libertarianism during my junior year in high school (1962–1963), when ... I read Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged ... A few months later, the first issue of my Freeman subscription arrived, and in it I found a definition ... of a word that was also new to me: the word libertarian. With something of a start, I realized that this word described me. I was a 'libertarian' – and not, as I had thought, a conservative."
    Module 12: The Modern Quest for Liberty
    Last module of the Cato Home Study Course, includes link to listen or download audio program (3:03:35), questions and suggested readings
    "The final module of the Cato University curriculum examines the rebirth of libertarian thought from the 1940s onward. ... The publication in 1943 of books by three American writers, Rose Wilder Lane (The Discovery of Freedom), Isabel Paterson (The God of the Machine), and Ayn Rand (The Fountainhead), all extolling the creativity of the free and responsible individual, and in 1944 of books by the Austrian economists Ludwig von Mises (Omnipotent Government) and F. A. Hayek (The Road to Serfdom), both warning of the dangers of statism, helped to launch the modern libertarian movement."
    Related Topic: Mont Pelerin Society
    One Moral Standard for All, by Sheldon Richman, 15 Nov 2013
    Postulate that most nonlibertarians agree that initiation of force is wrong, but they have to be shown that the same moral standard should hold for private individuals and government personnel
    "If I can't legally impose mandates on people, as the Affordable Care Act does, why can Barack Obama and members of Congress do so? If I can't forcibly forbid you to use marijuana or heroin or cocaine, why can DEA agents do it? Those officials are human beings. You are a human being. I am a human being. So we must have the same basic rights. Therefore, what you and I may not do, they may not do."
    On the Origins of the Modern Libertarian Legal Movement [PDF], by Roger Pilon, Chapman Law Review, 2013
    Historical survey of libertarian influences on constitutional and other areas of law, from the mid-1970s to recent decisions
    "The growing influence of the modern libertarian legal movement in America and beyond was no better illustrated recently than during the two-year run-up to the Supreme Court's 'Obamacare' decision .... Marginalized for years by many conservatives—to say nothing of the long dominant liberal establishment that dismissed their arguments out of hand—libertarians offered a principled vision that resonated not only with judges ... but with a large part of the American public as well—and, in the end, with a majority on the High Court itself. And why not: The vision was grounded in the nation's First Principles."
    Paul's Apology: Say it ain't so, Dr. No, by Jacob Sullum, Reason, 16 Jan 2008
    Examines Ron Paul's record, the controversy over his newsletters and Paul's response
    "On CNN Paul emphasized that racist libertarian is an oxymoron, since libertarians judge people as individuals. He should follow through on that point by ... repudiating not just the sentiments it represents but the poisonous, self-defeating strategy of building an anti-collectivist movement on group hatred."
    Related Topic: Ron Paul
    Radicals for Capitalism: A Freewheeling History of the Modern American Libertarian Movement, by David Gordon, The Mises Review, Dec 2007
    Review of Brian Doherty's Radicals for Capitalism
    "In undertaking a survey of libertarianism, two divergent approaches suggest themselves. One can adopt a particular view of correct libertarian doctrine. A certain variety of libertarianism, e.g., Rothbardian anarchism, can be taken as 'libertarianism rightly so called': other varieties will be assessed by the extent of their deviations from the favored position. One might, by contrast, confine oneself to a description of all the various sorts of views that claim to be libertarian. Here only points that all, or nearly all, self-professed libertarians accept will be deemed essential to the concept of libertarianism."
    Reading the Literature of Liberty, by Roy A. Childs, Jr., May 1987
    Childs' selection of "great books", including works by Hazlitt, Bastiat, Rose Wilder Lane, Nock, Ayn Rand, Friedman, Hayek, Rothbard, Mises and Nozick
    "Any listing of the 'great books' of liberty published in recent times must necessarily be a personal one. Libertarianism is first and foremost the doctrine championing individual freedom, private property, unfettered capitalism, and free trade. As such, it has never been captured fully in any one book or essay. As a doctrine, it lies scattered throughout the pages of countless books and articles; as a point of view, it has many variations."
    Rights Violations Aren't the Only Bads, by Sheldon Richman, 17 Jan 2014
    Discusses criticism of "Intellectual Property Fosters Corporate Concentration" in the larger context of rights violations
    "What I'm arguing for is a commonsense category of noninvasive moral offenses, wrongful acts that do not involve force. ... forced-backed remedies are not the only — or even the best — remedies available. Nonviolent responses, including boycotts, shunning, and gossip, can be highly effective. Libertarians ought to beware of embracing such a narrow view of morality that only forceful invasions of persons and property are deserving of moral outrage and response. Think of all the cruel ways people can treat others without lifting a hand. Are we to remain silent in the face of such abuse?"
    Rockwell on Libertarianism, by Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr., 20 Apr 2007
    Interview by Jedrzej Kuskowski for the Polish Libertarian Website Liberalis; topics discussed include libertarianism, the Internet, movement leaders, the State, Ron Paul, the Libertarian Party, left-libertarians, Milton Friedman, immigration and Poland
    "The movement is growing beyond belief, in all sectors of society and in nearly all countries, so far as I can tell. The web has been important, obviously. Libertarians have always believed that getting the ideas out there is the most important step we can take. Any media that get our message out are thrilling, especially the media that are not highly controlled by government."
    Related Topic: The State
    Speaking to Nonlibertarians, by Sheldon Richman, 11 Jul 2014
    Suggests an approach by which libertarians can try to persuade others of the benefits of freed markets
    "... people’s attraction to government-provided social services is not the problem (they believe they pay for them through taxes), because similar services offered in the voluntary sector (for-profit or mutual) would be not only unobjectionable but salutary. ... the libertarian approach should focus on the flawed political method by which the services are provided, not the purported objects of the services themselves — security."
    Related Topic: Government
    Tackling Straw Men Is Easier than Critiquing Libertarianism, by Sheldon Richman, 5 Dec 2014
    Counters John Edward Terrell's critique of libertarianism using quotes from Adam Smith, Vernon Smith and Herbert Spencer
    "What people like Terrell don't realize — or perhaps realize too well — is that the fundamental point in dispute is not whether the individual is a social animal or a creature best suited for an atomistic existence. No libertarian I know of subscribes to the latter notion. The point in dispute is whether proper social life should be founded on peaceful consensual cooperation or on compulsion."
    Test your freedom IQ, The Orange County Register, 18 Jun 2006
    20 multiple-choice questions covering the role of government, free enterprise, taxes, property rights, free speech, religion, civil liberties, transportation, war and foreign policy, the Nanny State, gun ownership, education and immigration
    "Are you a rock-solid freedom lover, a closet authoritarian or an in-your-face socialist? Take the Register's first Freedom Quiz and see. It's devised with new graduates in mind, to help them understand their political philosophy as they head out into the real world or back into the not-so-real world of academia. Register editorial writers Alan Bock, John Seiler and Steven Greenhut developed these questions to highlight aspects of 'small l' libertarianism, the freedom philosophy that animates our pages."
    The Critical Dilemma Facing Pro-War Libertarians, by Jacob G. Hornberger, 14 Feb 2007
    Discusses the contradictions faced by U.S. libertarians and conservatives who endorsed or encouraged imperial and interventionist foreign policies
    "... libertarians hewed to a consistent philosophy — one that did not cause the libertarian to war against himself through a commitment to contradictory principles. Genuinely believing in a free society — a society based on free markets, private property, and limited government — libertarians have always favored the repeal, not the reform, of such socialist and interventionist programs as public (i.e., government) schooling, Medicare, Medicaid, income taxation, the drug war, and economic regulations."
    The Death of Politics, by Karl Hess, Playboy, Mar 1969
    Discusses libertarianism, contrasting it with both conservatism and modern liberalism, including specific policy differences
    "... the radical-revolutionary position is a lonely one. It is feared and hated, by both right and left — although both right and left must borrow from it to survive. The radical-revolutionary position is libertarianism ... Libertarianism is rejected by the modern left — which preaches individualism but practices collectivism. Capitalism is rejected by the modern right — which preaches enterprise but practices protectionism."
    The Essence of Liberty: What is it that really makes one a libertarian?, by David F. Nolan, Libertarian Party News, Mar 1995
    Discusses five points of "no compromise" that Nolan considered essential to libertarianism
    "First and foremost, libertarians believe in the principle of self-ownership. ... Self-ownership implies the right to self-defense. ... libertarians believe that individuals have the right to own and use anything-gold, guns, marijuana, sexually explicit material-so long as they do not harm others through force or the threat of force. ... In an ideal world, there would be no taxation. ... The fifth and final key test ... is their support for an honest money system ..."
    The Inherently Humble Libertarian, by Sheldon Richman, 13 Feb 2015
    Defends libertarianism from those who charge its advocates of "know-it-allness"
    "To put it succinctly, libertarianism has humility baked in at the most fundamental level. Humility is not to be conflated with radical doubt, however. One can be humble while also believing it is possible to know things. And some things, including the nature and market implications of human action, can be known conceptually. One can know, for example, that intelligently planning an economy or even a particular market is beyond anyone's, including one's own, capacities."
    The Myth of 19th-Century Laissez-Faire: Who Benefits Today?, by Roderick Long, 10 Jun 2013
    Responds to questions posed by Michael Lind and E. J. Dionne Jr. regarding lack of actual libertarian countries or the late 19th century supposedly small government utopia
    "Libertarianism is great for ordinary people, but not for the power elites that control countries and determine what policies they implement, and who don't welcome seeing their privileged status subjected to free-market competition. And ordinary people don't agitate for libertarian policies because most of them are not familiar with the full case for libertarianism's benefits, in large part because the education system is controlled by the aforementioned elites."
    Related Topic: Benjamin Tucker
    The Only Thing Dumber Than Libertarianism's Critics are its Right-Wing Defenders, by Kevin Carson, 22 Jun 2013
    Responds to question posed by Michael Lind regarding lack of actual libertarian countries and an attempted rebuttal by Robert Tracinski
    "Every country in the world has an interventionist state. Every country in the world has class exploitation. Every country in history with a state, since states first arose, has also had classes and economic exploitation. The correlation is one hundred percent. This fact is key to understanding why Lind's framing of the question is so naive. Lind writes as though the adoption of this or that form of polity by 'countries' was simply a matter of peoples collectively deciding on the best way of life for everyone involved."
    The Political Compass & Why Libertarianism is Not Right-Wing, by Jan Clifford Lester, 1994
    Presents a Political Compass in contrast to the traditional left/right spectrum, with a north-south axis of Choice vs. (state) Control and a west-east axis of Personal and Property Choice, and a 20 question quiz to determine one's political bearing
    "Libertarianism (or extreme classical liberalism) is sometimes placed, often implicitly or vaguely, somewhere on the extreme right. ... How are we to indicate the extreme tolerance of personal choice (as regards drug use and consenting sexual practices, for instance) that libertarianism entails but which is not normally thought of as being right-wing?... But now libertarians can, if necessary, practice tit-for-tat by lumping together non-libertarians as undifferentiated 'south-wingers' or 'authoritarians'."
    Related Topics: Marshall Fritz, David F. Nolan
    The Roots of Modern Libertarian Ideas, by Brian Doherty, Cato Policy Report, Mar 2007
    Survey of the history of libertarian ideas, from ancient China and Greece to 20th century writers
    "Libertarianism has its basis in economic, moral, and political theory, rooted in ideas about how workable order can arise uncoordinated by a single controlling mind, how and where it is proper for a human to use force against another, and the likely dire effects of concentrated, unchecked power. But the element that distinguishes libertarianism's unique place in political thought is that it is radical, taking insights about order, justice, and the struggle between liberty and power further and deeper than most standard American liberals, patriots, or old-fashioned Jeffersonians."
    Two-dimensional libertarianism, by Anthony Gregory, Rational Review, 30 Sep 2004
    Questions the usefulness of the two-dimensional Nolan Chart and the World's Smallest Political Quiz and advocates instead a one-dimensional liberty vs. power spectrum
    "It might be useful to notice that conservatives and liberals tend to advocate certain liberties, which tend to fit in these somewhat distinguishable categories -- but in the end it's arbitrary. What makes libertarians libertarians is that we recognize that all liberties relate to each other. ... the two-dimensional chart ... may just perpetuate the myth that conservatives and liberals have internally consistent positions, and that each group has more in common with libertarians than the two groups have with each other."
    Two Libertarian Classics, by Murray N. Rothbard, Reason, Mar 1974
    Reviews of Albert Jay Nock's Our Enemy the State and John T. Flynn's As We Go Marching
    "Often equally scholarly, the radical libertarian sets forth with an air of determined hostility to the entire State apparatus, to the government and all its works. It is not just that the radical libertarian consistently opposes all government intervention whatever, so that one need not wait for the cost-benefit computer to come up with his political position on each particular issue. There is more to it than that—for the radical libertarian has a totally different viewpoint of the nature of the State itself."
    We Need an Angel Like Clarence, by Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr., Mises Daily, 28 Dec 2006
    Examines, by example, the "unseen" benefits of libertarian activism over the past century
    "Libertarian ideology, in all its forms, has literally saved the world from the state, which always and everywhere wants to advance and never roll back. If it does not advance and if it does roll back (however rarely), it is to the credit of public ideology. ... Libertarian ideas are like stones dropping into water, which make waves in so many directions that no one is sure where they come from."
    Related Topic: The State
    What an Honest Conversation about Race Would Look Like, by Sheldon Richman, 19 Jul 2013
    Argues that government policies, such as drug prohibition, gun control and mandatory schooling, are enablers for racism
    "... things like the war on certain drug manufacturers, merchants, and consumers; the crusade against 'illegal' guns; the minimum wage and related laws; and the government's schools. All of these by far take their greatest toll on people of color. Private racism, whether violent or nonviolent, is evil and abhorrent; it is also unlibertarian — yes, even nonviolent racism is unlibertarian, as I point out in 'Libertarianism = Anti-Racism.'"
    What Are Libertarians Out to Accomplish?, by Sheldon Richman, 23 Jan 2015
    Reviews a 1979 Nathaniel Branden speech bout the manner in which libertarians communicate with non-libertarians
    "Branden was appealing to libertarians to be ruthlessly honest with themselves about why they were activists. If the reason was something other than achieving a free society through persuasion, then self-examination would be in order. If one's motives were mixed, then introspection might identify why one engaged in self-sabotage, such as intentionally alienating nonlibertarians."
    What Should Libertarians Do?, by Sheldon Richman, 25 Apr 2014
    Examines what libertarianism demands from people and suggests focusing on the liberal insight that "societies run themselves" spontaneously
    "Libertarians simultaneously ask little of people and a lot. We ask little when we preach nonaggression, because most people already practice nonaggression in their own lives. ... On the other hand, we ask a lot when we ask people to believe that free markets work. Most people know nothing about economics. Except in the most micro sense, they do not engage in the 'economic way of thinking.'"
    Why I am a Libertarian, by Mark Richards, 21 May 2008
    Describes the persons (mainly his mother) and events that influenced him in becoming a libertarian
    "So here I was a young teenager in the late 1960s and I didn't like the liberal left that was manipulating the youth in America at that time but I also rejected the 'establishment' (the government and its allies in the media, public education, and the churches) which I knew was lying to the American people. It was through those John Birch Society publications that my mother had picked up at that country fair that I first became acquainted with economists and authors like Ayn Rand, Ludwig von Mises, Milton Friedman, F.A. Hayek, Henry Hazlitt, Murray Rothbard, and others who were proponents of the freedom philosophy."
    Winning the Battle for Freedom and Prosperity, by John Mackey, Liberty, Jun 2006
    Updated from speech given at FreedomFest 2004; after a brief background on himself, Mackey criticises the freedom movement from a marketing and branding perspective and suggests a different approach by de-emphasising some issues and prioritising others
    "I stumbled into reading Milton Friedman, Friedrich Hayek, Ludwig von Mises, Ayn Rand — I read all of them. ... I identify myself as a Libertarian. I am one of those people who actually votes Libertarian. ... What I love most about the freedom movement are the ideas of voluntary cooperation and spontaneous order when channeled through free markets, leading to the continuous evolution and progress of humanity."
    A Fairy Tale of the Austrian Movement, by Joseph T. Salerno, Mises Daily, 25 Sep 2007
    Review of Brian Doherty's Radicals for Capitalism, in particular of the section in chapter 7 where Peter Boettke discusses Austrian economics
    "The outstanding merit of Brian Doherty's book is that it contains a treasure trove of valuable information regarding the events, personalities, periodicals and organizations whose complex interplay influenced the intellectual and institutional development of the modern American libertarian movement. ... he takes at face value and naively repeats without critical discussion the most absurd and self-serving pronouncements by commentators aligned with one faction or another. Nowhere is this more evident than in his treatment of the contemporary revival of Austrian economics, a key factor that drove the evolution of the modern libertarian movement"
    Alternative Medicine Is Libertarian Medicine, by Butler Shaffer, 2 Dec 2006
    Discusses several aspects of healthcare, including self-ownership, being responsible for our own care, decentralised information, the collapse of external authorities and the dehumanizing decisions resulting from institutionalized healthcare
    "From a libertarian perspective, the 'self-ownership' question is what this conference is all about. Indeed, this is all that libertarian thinking comes down to. The 'war on drugs,' conscription, taxation, compulsory education, war, . . . everything the state touches, comes down to a question of 'who owns you?' Ownership is manifested by control, ... who gets to make decisions about what?"
    Benjamin Tucker, Individualism, & Liberty: Not the Daughter but the Mother of Order, by Wendy McElroy, Literature of Liberty, 1981
    Bibliographical essay covering the people and radical movements that influenced Tucker in his founding and publishing of Liberty, its major themes and contributors
    "Internal conflicts and compromises over supporting the [Civil] War splintered the movement so that libertarianism thereafter was basically expressed, not as a movement in its own right, but as the radical faction within other movements such as freethought and free love. ... In many ways, Tucker exemplified the golden age of libertarianism which faltered in the face of growing statism and militarism. ... His death, like that of Herbert Spencer, marked the end of an era. Libertarianism as an organized movement in America would not appear again for many years."
    Best of Both Worlds: Milton Friedman reminisces about his career as an economist and his lifetime "avocation" as a spokesman for freedom, by Brian Doherty, Reason, Jun 1995
    Topics discussed include: the new Congress, flat taxes, the withholding tax, the people who influenced him, what led him to write about policy issues, libertarianism and how his political views have changed over the years
    "However, libertarian is not a self-defining term. There are many varieties of libertarians. There's a zero-government libertarian, an anarchist. There's a limited-government libertarianism. They share a lot in terms of their fundamental values. If you trace them to their ultimate roots, they are different. It doesn't matter in practice, because we both want to work in the same direction."
    Clint Eastwood announces: I'm a "libertarian", Libertarian Party News, 18 Feb 1997
    Libertarian Party press release based on Eastwood's response to a Playboy interview question: "How would you characterize yourself politically?"
    "Eastwood joins a growing number of individuals in the entertainment industry who have identified themselves as libertarians. Included on that list are TV star John Laroquette, humorist Dave Barry, author P.J. O'Rourke, movie actor Russell Means, magician Jillette Penn, author Camille Paglia, TV reporter John Stossell, and comedian Dennis Miller."
    Enemy of the State, by Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr., Mises Daily, 24 Nov 2006
    Review of Justin Raimondo's An Enemy of the State
    "Rothbard was the architect of the body of thought known around the world as libertarianism. This radically anti-state political philosophy unites free-market economics, a no-exceptions attachment to private property rights, a profound concern for human liberty, and a love of peace with the conclusion that society should be completely free to develop absent any interference from the state, which can and should be eliminated."
    Related Topic: Murray N. Rothbard
    Floyd Arthur 'Baldy' Harper, RIP, by Murray N. Rothbard, The Libertarian Forum, May 1973
    Biographical remembrance of "Baldy" including his involvement in FEE, the Volker Fund and the IHS
    "But Baldy's abiding passion was a deep concern for strategy, for the development of a strategic theory and practice for the libertarian cause. It was out of this concern for strategy that Baldy developed his lifelong dream, his vision of the course which libertarians must take for ultimate victory. He saw that the nub and the heart of libertarian strategy must be ideas and scholarship, that activism could never succeed unless informed by a body of ideas and research on the deepest and most advanced levels. Baldy's great vision was to guide and develop a body of libertarian scholarship and research."
    Frederic Bastiat, Ingenious Champion for Liberty and Peace, by Jim Powell, The Freeman, Jun 1997
    Lengthy biographical essay, covering those who influenced Bastiat as well as those influenced by him, his writings (including correspondence with his friend Félix Coudroy), his roles in the French Constituent and Legistative Assemblies and his legacy
    "Amidst the upheaval, Bastiat published about a dozen issues of La République française, a two-page periodical defending libertarian principles. He insisted that people must be secure in 'all rights, those of the conscience as well as those of intelligence; those of property, like those of work; those of the family as those of the commune; those of the country as those of humanity. I have no other ideal than universal justice; no other banner than that of our flag: Liberty, Equality, Fraternity.'"
    Gil's Libertarian Mix Tape, by Gil Guillory, 6 Jan 2007
    Includes lyrics to the 18 selected songs; broken into categories of Economics (five songs), Fight the Man (four), Omnipotent Government (6) and The Promise of Freedom (four)
    "Some of the unwritten rules of making a mix tape are: - songs must be good - tapes are limited to about 90 min running time - try to pick songs that are unlikely to have been heard by the listener - tell a story or pick a theme - track sequencing is important — must have good flow - the selections should reflect your personality. Doing my best to adhere to these rules, I present my own libertarian mix tape below. The point is to demonstrate and explain libertarian ideas, so I will comment on or explain each song."
    Related Topic: Music
    How To Sell Liberty, by Jarret B. Wollstein, Jun 1998
    Discusses eight principles of effective salesmanship and how to apply them to market liberty
    "Some groups are particularly solid prospects for libertarianism, including: - Baby Boomers ... - Generation Xers ... - Students – their minds are still open; - Beleaguered Taxpayers – they are already fed up with big government; - Small Business Owners ... - Victims of the State – the unjustly arrested, law-abiding gun owners, peaceful drug users, and those with unconventional lifestyles."
    Related Topic: Liberty
    Interview with Robert Nozick, by Julian Sanchez, 26 Jul 2001
    Topics discussed include: ethics, science and philosophy, Karl Popper and the scientific method, Ayn Rand and epistemology, consciousness, relativism and the academic left and Nozick himself
    "Perhaps it has to do with the two sides of libertarian ideas. There is the boldness and excitement of libertarian ideas, the new possibilities for thinking, and for life in society that they open up, and there also are the sharp, and sharply reasoned, weapons they provide for attacking and even crushing other ideas. So perhaps it is not surprising that libertarianism has attracted two distinct types of temperaments, each one resonating to one of libertarianism's two different aspects."
    Jane Cobden: Carrying on Her Father's Work, by Sheldon Richman, 25 Jul 2014
    Biographical essay on Jane Cobden, daughter of Richard Cobden, who continued her father's advocacy of free trade and other libertarian issues
    "The triplet land reform, peace, and social justice has a left-wing sound today, but that’s because the modern classical liberal/libertarian movement from the 1930s onward got sidetracked by an alliance of convenience with the conservative and nationalist American Right, which, like the liberals, also opposed the New Deal and (in those days, but alas no more) militarism."
    Related Topic: Richard Cobden
    Joan Kennedy Taylor, by Jeff Riggenbach, 14 Jan 2011
    Biographical essay, including a review of Taylor's book Reclaiming the Mainstream: Individualist Feminism Rediscovered; transcript of "The Libertarian Tradition" podcasts of 28 Dec 2010 and 12 Jan 2011
    "Were not women individuals, just as men were? It seemed to Joan that any libertarian was by definition also a feminist. Did not women own their own bodies, just as men did? Were they not entitled to the same rights that men enjoyed? What sort of 'libertarian' would balk at amending the US Constitution to recognize the equal rights of women, when these rights had been systematically abrogated and denied in large and small ways, both by the federal government and by state and local governments, ever since the founding of the United States?"
    NewMont Pelerin: 1947-1978, The Road to Libertarianism, by Ralph Raico, Libertarian Review, Dec 1979
    Reviews the presentations and discussions at the 1978 meeting of the Mont Pelerin Society, with an overview of the Society's history and particularly the 1958 meeting which had similar themes
    "One of the most interesting aspects of the 1978 Mont Pelerin meeting was the speakers’ widespread use of the words 'libertarian' and 'libertarianism' to describe the Mont Pelerin society and its members. ... Indeed, a major event at the Mont Pelerin meeting was a special session on the libertarian movement around the world. Altogether, the extensive interest in libertarianism at the Mont Pelerin meeting and the intensive enthusiasm of the younger participants for an active libertarian movement was one of the clearest ramifications of the Hong Kong meeting."
    On Political Activism, by Samuel Edward Konkin III, Reason, May 1977
    Letter to the editor, criticising John Hospers' view that running for political office as part of the Libertarian Party is "the quickest way of getting libertarian ideas known to millions"
    "To the extent that libertarianism is known in North America today, it is almost entirely because of the tireless work of a few educators, activists, and persons of prominence not afraid to be associated with a small, militant, and unpopular movement: Murray Rothbard, Robert LeFevre, Andrew J. Galambos, Leonard Read, Ludwig von Mises, Don Ernsberger, Dana Rohrabacher, Isabel Patterson, Rose Wilder Lane, Baldy Harper, all the persons of accomplishment I named earlier, many local activists reaching 10 or 20 or 30 people at a time with meetings, demonstrations, events being seriously covered in local papers on a recurring basis ..."
    Related Topic: Libertarian Party
    Pathetic Arguments for Foreign Intervention, by Sheldon Richman, 25 Jan 2008
    Discusses comments made by Bret Stephens of the Wall Street Journal about Ron Paul's call for U.S. withdrawal from the Middle East
    "Is he serious? Libertarians make no accounting for people motivated by the desire to dominate? If that were true we wouldn't work so hard to minimize government power. When will interventionists realize that their plans for protecting us from bad guys abroad require the placement of awesome corrupting power in the hands of politicians here?"
    Related Topic: Foreign Entanglements
    Regime Libertarians, by Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr., 12 Jul 2005
    Criticises the "Iraq Exit Strategy: America's Path Forward" proposal, made by the Libertarian National Committee on 29 June 2005, and suggests the name "Regime Libertarianism" for those who make proposals such as these
    "What Laissez-Faire Libertarians seek is the removal of the state from society — indeed a complete separation is necessary. ... The state's managers need not establish phony markets such as 'Social Security Accounts,' school vouchers or any of the many schemes hatched by Regime Libertarians. It just needs to go away."
    Reverence for Skeptics, by Leland B. Yeager, Liberty, Oct 2007
    Describes how Prof. Yeager albeit raised as Christian became what he calls a "reverent atheist" and discusses the bases for his views
    "Libertarianism is a doctrine or attitude about social and economic organization and policy. It is tolerant of diverse grounds for accepting it. It does not require theological roots and could even be embarrassed by insistence on them."
    Related Topic: Atheism
    Robert A. Heinlein's Soaring Spirit of Liberty, by Jim Powell, The Freeman, Jul 1997
    Biographical essay, including multiple quotes from fellow authors and significant excerpts from Heinlein's novels and stories
    "In The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress (1966), Heinlein offers perhaps his most well-developed libertarian vision. ... The moon, referred to as Luna, is a colony of the Earth which uses it as a place to keep convicts and political dissidents. They resent the Earth's trade monopoly, which means selling Earth products at steep prices, buying Luna products for little—and ultimately starving people on Luna. They don't like laws, but they respect customs. They cherish individual initiative and enterprise. They tolerate other people's lifestyle choices and mind their own business. ...'"
    Robert Nozick and the Value of Liberty, by Aaron Ross Powell, 21 Jun 2011
    Responds to Stephen Metcalf's essay "The Liberty Scam", published on Slate.com
    "Like so many critics of libertarianism, Metcalf does not understand the scope of the libertarian argument. I value liberty, yes, but I also value my health, my daughter's happiness, and films staring William Powell and Myrna Loy. In fact, libertarians, progressives, and even Robert Nozick value quite a lot of things. The libertarian argument is simply that a state that attempts to directly maximize any value besides liberty—by, say, coercively taxing in order to pay for more Thin Man films—violates individual rights. What's more, if the state does remain limited to protecting only liberty, we'll get more health, happiness, and great movies."
    Robert Nozick, Philosopher of Liberty, by Roderick Long, The Freeman, Sep 2002
    Focuses mainly on Nozick's contributions in Anarchy, State, and Utopia, with brief reference to his later works and his death earlier in 2002
    "Twenty-eight years ago a Harvard philosophy professor named Robert Nozick did something unthinkable in polite intellectual society: he published a book defending libertarianism. In 1974 libertarian ideas had virtually no presence within the academic establishment. ... Nozick's book did not, of course, convert the profession; but it secured for libertarianism a place among the standard topics for philosophical discussion, and thereby contributed to a crucial change in the intellectual climate."
    Samuel Edward Konkin III, by Jeff Riggenbach, 29 Jul 2010
    Biographical essay; including examination of Konkin's ideas on the Counter-Economy; transcript of "The Libertarian Tradition" podcast of 20 July 2010
    "The 1970s and '80s were a heady time in the history of the modern libertarian movement. The movement had just experienced a massive increase in population, virtually all at once. ... Suddenly mainstream publishers were interested in issuing new, hardcover books about libertarianism. In 1970, from Bobbs-Merrill, came Radical Libertarianism by Jerome Tuccille. In 1973 came The Machinery of Freedom by David Friedman and For a New Liberty by Murray N. Rothbard and How I Found Freedom in an Unfree World by Harry Browne."
    NewThe Cato Institute at 40, by Peter Goettler, Aaron Powell, Trevor Burrus, 10 Mar 2017
    Interview with Peter Goettler, President and CEO of the Cato Institute since March 2015
    "Aaron Powell: ... One of the things that comes up when we're engaging with guests or when we get comments from people is libertarianism as a set of principles is a fairly broad concept. And, there are, we'll just say, there can be in fighting within libertarianism and disagreement about principles within libertarianism. You have the wide range of on the one hand the classical liberal, more moderate positions, and on the extreme other end you have your outright anarchists who all call themselves libertarian."
    The Invisible Gnomes and the Invisible Hand: South Park and Libertarian Philosophy, by Paul Cantor, 4 Dec 2006
    Includes detailed review and discussion of season 2 "Gnomes" episode
    "Libertarianism is a philosophy of radical freedom, and particularly celebrates the free market as a form of social organization. ... With its support for unconditional freedom in all areas of life, libertarianism defies categorization in terms of the standard one-dimensional political spectrum of right and left."
    Related Topics: South Park, Capitalism, Trey Parker
    The Justice and Prudence of War: Toward A Libertarian Analysis, by Roderick Long, Mises Daily, 20 Sep 2006
    Examines the ethics of war from a libertarian perspective, considering both deontological and consequentialist claims
    "Here I shall distinguish between libertarianism as a normative ethical theory — a theory of justice — and libertarianism as a descriptive social theory. Libertarians disagree with one another as to the extent of the former's dependence on the latter; utilitarian libertarians profess to believe the dependence total, while natural-rights libertarians profess to believe it nonexistent, but in practice both groups tend to treat the dependence as partial ..."
    The Libertarian Press, by Ronald Lora and William Henry Longton (editors), The Conservative Press in Twentieth-Century America, 1999
    Introduction to historical reviews of Freeman (1920-24), Freeman (1950-), analysis, New Individualist Review, Objectivist, Fragments and Libertarian Forum
    "Among the early leading lights of libertarian philosophy in America are Thomas Paine and nineteenth-century expositors Lysander Spooner, Josiah Warren, and Benjamin Tucker. With reservations, historians have added William Graham Sumner and Henry George to the list, for both social theorists exercised enormous influence on later proponents of radical individualism, among them Albert Jay Nock, Frank Chodorov, and economists Milton Friedman and Murray Rothbard. Economic theoreticians Friedriech Hayek and Ludwig von Mises often found themselves adjudged as libertarians, though 'free market liberal' seems a more apt description."
    Related Topic: Periodicals
    The Libertarians' Albatross, by Butler Shaffer, 3 Nov 2004
    Recounts the author's introduction to objectivism and provides critical analysis of the philosophy's shortcomings
    "The modern 'libertarian' movement is the most focused philosophic expression of this undercurrent of change, for it is grounded not only in a distrust of power, but in the confidence that a free and peaceful social order can arise only out of the spontaneous and autonomous behavior of individuals. Libertarian thinking also reflects the pluralistic assumption that a condition of liberty will produce a variety of tastes, ideas, social practices, and behavior; and that only a respect for the inviolability of the lives and other property of individuals can produce such ends."
    Related Topic: Objectivism
    NewThe Libertarian Student Movement, by Wolf von Laer, Aaron Powell, Caleb Brown, Free Thoughts, 17 Feb 2017
    Interview with Wolf von Laer, CEO of Students for Liberty, to discuss the status of the liberty movement on college campuses
    "Because Libertarianism is the only ideology which really trusts people. Because if you talk to both the left and the right, if it really goes down to something, why they want to impose their world view is because they think that people are stupid. Because they think they cannot govern themselves. We believe that people can actually do that. ... most people when they hear Libertarianism, it's things like, we are just like radical individualists who just want to fight for ourselves ... But no. We understand the value of community. We understand that complex social problems have to be addressed by complex institutions which are built of many, many people."
    The Many Monopolies, by Charles W. Johnson, 24 Aug 2011
    Describes four ways in which markets are distorted by government interventions, explains Tucker's "Four Monopolies", examines five present-day monopolies and discusses Tucker's libertarian views
    "For most of the twentieth century American libertarians were seen as defenders of 'capitalism' ... Most libertarians ... seemed to agree that libertarianism meant defending business against the attacks of 'big government,' and the purpose of laissez faire was to unleash existing forms of commerce from political restraints. ... For Tucker, ... libertarianism meant an attack on economic privilege by removing the political privileges that propped it up, dismantling monopolies by exposing them to competition from below."
    The Politics of Étienne de La Boétie, by Murray N. Rothbard, 1975
    Introduction to the 1975 edition of The Politics of Obedience: The Discourse of Voluntary Servitude, translated by Harry Kurz; summarises the key insights of La Boétie's work
    "In that task, La Boétie also speaks to us in his stress on the importance of a perceptive, vanguard elite of libertarian and antistatist intellectuals. The role of this 'cadre' — to grasp the essence of statism and to desanctify the State in the eyes and minds of the rest of the population — is crucial to the potential success of any movement to bring about a free society. It becomes, therefore, a prime libertarian task to discover, coalesce, nurture, and advance its cadre — a task of which all too many libertarians remain completely ignorant."
    Vince Miller and the International Libertarian Movement, by Jeff Riggenbach, 1 Jul 2010
    Biographical essay; including background information on the libertarian movement of the 20th century; transcript of "The Libertarian Tradition" podcast of 23 June 2010
    "... the libertarian movement ... founders were men and women who ranged in age from their 30s to their 60s. They represented ... two different generations. The first group, born in the 1880s, included Rose Wilder Lane and Isabel Paterson ... as well as Ludwig von Mises ... The members of this first group served as mentors and teachers for the members of the second group ... born around the turn of the 20th century ... Thus Mises was teacher to Friedrich Hayek ... as Paterson was teacher to Ayn Rand ... Leonard Read ... learned from both Lane and Mises, though at a distance, rather than close at hand."
    Voltairine de Cleyre: Penitent Priestess of Anarchism, by Jeff Riggenbach, 17 Jun 2010
    Biographical essay, transcript of "The Libertarian Tradition" podcast of 8 June 2010
    "The libertarian movement of today dates from the early 1940s, the period of US participation in World War II. It underwent a very sudden and very substantial spurt of growth during the late 1960s and early 1970s, and has grown steadily ever since. There was an earlier libertarian movement in the United States, however ... This 'first libertarian movement,' as the late Samuel Edward Konkin III used to like to call it, was largely [Benjamin R.] Tucker's creation, centered around his fortnightly paper Liberty, which he published from 1881 to 1908 ..."
    Was Robert A. Heinlein a Libertarian?, by Jeff Riggenbach, 2 Jun 2010
    Biographical essay, focused on attempting to answer the title question; transcript of "The Libertarian Tradition" of 18 May 2010
    "In the early 1970s, according to a survey undertaken at the time by SIL, the Society for Individual Liberty, one libertarian activist in six had been led to libertarianism by reading the novels and short stories of Robert A. Heinlein. ... The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress, for example, the winner of the Hugo award as the best science fiction novel of 1966, is the story of a libertarian revolution on the moon — a revolution designed to free Luna from the control of politicians and bureaucrats on Terra, that is, the Earth."
    Why We Consent to Oppression: Self-suppression paves the way for political suppression, by Peter R. Breggin, Reason, Sep 1977
    Examines the questions posed by La Boétie in his "Discourse" from a psychological perspective, particularly how childhood self-suppression leads most adults to more easily accept government oppression
    "Libertarians tend not to take human attitudes toward each other into account when hoping for and planning for a more libertarian world. ... A libertarian society will thrive only when individuals are willing to value each other as human beings, even if they do not know or care for each other. It will thrive only when individuals are willing to value each other's freedom regardless of any gain or loss to themselves. Libertarianism will become a viable principle of society whenever men and women become willing to live by, and, if necessary, to fight for each other's liberty."

    Publications

    The Journal of Libertarian Studies, by Ludwig von Mises Institute
    Quarterly
    "The Journal of Libertarian Studies (1977–2010) was founded by Murray N. Rothbard in 1977 and was the premiere venue for the advancement of liberterianism, anarcho-capitalism, the individualist society, and non-interventionism as the first principle of political theory and practice."

    Books

    Libertarianism: A Primer
        by David Boaz, 1997
    Partial contents: The Coming Libertarian Age - The Roots of Libertarianism - What Rights Do We Have? - The Dignity of the Individual - Pluralism and Toleration - Law and the Constitution - Civil Society - The Market Process - The Libertarian Future
    Libertarianism in One Lesson: Why Libertarianism Is the Best Hope for America's Future
        by David P. Bergland, 1984
    Partial contents: The Nature of Government - The Alternative to Coercive Government - The Libertarian Difference - Libertarian Analysis of the Issues - Foreign Policy, Free Trade and National Defense - Taxation as Theft - What About the Poor People?
    The Great Libertarian Offer
        by Harry Browne, 2000
    Partial contents: A Libertarian America - How Government Operates - Do You Want Freedom or Symbolism? - Free from the Income Tax - Freedom to Make Your Own Choices - Freedom from War - Freedom to Learn - The Libertarian Path - Liberty in Your Lifetime
    The Libertarian Idea
        by Jan Narveson, 1989
    Partial contents: Liberalism, Conservatism, Libertarianism - Liberty: Negative versus Positive - Rights - Liberty and Property - Is Libertarianism Rational? - Intuitions in Moral Philosophy - Contractarianism to Libertarianism? - Society and the Market
    The Libertarian Reader: Classic and Contemporary Writings from Lao Tzu to Milton Friedman
        by David Boaz, 1997
    Includes essays by Bastiat, Cobden, Milton Friedman, Hayek, Jefferson, Locke, Mencken, Nozick, Thomas Paine, Ayn Rand, Rothbard, Adam Smith, Herbert Spencer, Lysander Spooner, Alexis de Tocqueville, Laozi, Ludwig von Mises and Mary Wollstonecraft
    Three Libertarian Essays
        by Daniel B. Klein, Foundation for Economic Education, 1998
    Contents: Go Ahead and Let Him Try: A Plea for Economic Laissez-Faire - Liberty, Dignity, and Responsibility: The Moral Triad of a Good Society - If Government is So Villainous How Come Government Officials Don't Seem Like Villains?
    Total Freedom: Toward a Dialectical Libertarianism
        by Chris Matthew Sciabarra, 2000
    Partial Contents: Aristotle: The Fountainhead - From Aristotle to Hegel - After Hegel - Defining Dialectics - Foundations - The Market versus the State - Class Dynamics and Structural Crisis - On the Precipice of Utopia - The Dialectical Libertarian Turn
    What It Means to Be a Libertarian: A Personal Interpretation
        by Charles Murray, 1997
    Partial contents: The Public Good - Removing Government from Economic Life - Tolerance and Discrimination - Permitting Revolutions in Education and Health Care - Protecting the Environment - Removing Government from Civil Life - Lived Freedom
    For a New Liberty: The Libertarian Manifesto, by Murray N. Rothbard, 1973
    Partial contents: The Libertarian Heritage - Property and Exchange - The State - The Problems - Involuntary Servitude - Personal Liberty - Education - Welfare and the Welfare State - The Public Sector - War and Foreign Policy - A Strategy for Liberty
    Related Topic: Liberty

    Videos


    Dr. Demento, Walter Block and Robert Anton Wilson: Sex, Drugs, and Rock n' Roll, by Dr. Demento, Walter Block, Robert Anton Wilson, 5 Sep 1987
    Panel discussion at the 1987 Libertarian National Convention
    Upd
    Freedom Matters, Libertarianism.org, 1 Nov 2011
    A 60 second introduction to libertarianism

    Karl Hess: Tools to Dismantle the State , by Karl Hess, Aug 1986
    Talk given at the Third Libertarian International World Convention, Stockholm; starts off by tracing truly important events in human history, then discussing ways in which libertarians can be "filthy stinking rich or creatively poor" and ends with Q&A

    Leonard Liggio on the Rise of the Modern American Libertarian Movement, by Leonard P. Liggio, 9 Mar 1995
    Talk given at Vienna Coffee Club (Future of Freedom Foundation). Liggio starts off with the New Deal and covers many events and individuals both at the core and the periphery of the modern libertarian movement
    Upd
    Penn Jillette: Why I Am A Libertarian, by Penn Jillette, 21 Nov 2011
    Upd
    Robert Anton Wilson and Karl Hess: Subversion for Fun and Profit, by Karl Hess, Robert Anton Wilson, Sep 1987
    Wilson and Hess at the Libertarian Party national convention, fielding questions from the audience on numerous topics

    Roy A. Childs, Jr.: The Radical Libertarian Vision, by Roy A. Childs, Jr., 11 Apr 1981
    Talk given at the Libertarian Party 10th Anniversary National Convention; Childs presents his vision of what the Party should be emphasizing and trying to accomplish

    Take It To The Limits: Milton Friedman on Libertarianism, by Milton Friedman, Uncommon Knowledge, 10 Feb 1999
    Friedman discusses with Peter Robinson about what is libertarianism, which government functions are legitimate and how libertarians look at issues of public safety, protecting the environment and the right size of government itself

    The introductory paragraph uses material from a Wikipedia article, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.