1997 movie about a family fighting for their home against corporate and government interests

Reference

The Castle (film) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"The Castle is a 1997 Australian comedy film directed by Rob Sitch. It starred Michael Caton, Anne Tenney, Stephen Curry, Sophie Lee, Eric Bana (in his first film) and Charles 'Bud' Tingwell. The screenwriting team comprised Sitch, Santo Cilauro, Tom Gleisner and Jane Kennedy of Working Dog Productions. ..."

Cast and Crew

Michael CatonDarryl Kerrigan
Rob SitchDirector, co-writer

Video Products

The Castle (1999), 6 Jan 2012

Articles

Libertarian Movies & Films: The Top 25
List of 25 films considered "best of the best", includes general description, link to longer review page, content topics and review quotes
"When an airport attempts to 'compulsorily acquire' a home in its vicinity through the use of eminent domain, the homeowner it intends to evict fights back. ... 'The Castle reminds us of the value of small gestures, assuming the best in people, picking your fights and being fiercely loyal to those you love. When offered a tidy packet to sell his home, Darryl responds with a line that distills the film's emotional essence: "You can’t buy what I’ve got."' –The Guardian"

Reviews

A Man's Home Is His Castle, by Wendy McElroy, Future of Freedom, Jul 2006
"The Castle taps into the sadness, fear, and outrage that the average person feels when confronted by big government and big business. It also resonates with a theme that is strong in the American character: resistance to unjust authority. ... This movie is a comedic treasure. It is a loving homage to the common man who loves his family and his castle, and will fight anyone who threatens either."
The Castle (1997)
    by Jon Osborne, Miss Liberty's Guide to Film and Video, 2001
"It's just a run-down house on to which the homeowner himself has built some amateur extensions. It has a fake chimney, an oversized doghouse, and inelegant decorations. But that's the point. This is the worst-case scenario. It's not the objective market value of a home that determines either its value to the owner or his legal right to own it. To this homeowner, this home happens to be of enormous value, partly because he's tailored it to his particular tastes and partly because it's full of happy family memories."
The Castle (1997), by Stephen W. Carson
"... when the Kerrigan family receives a letter stating that their home will be 'compulsorily acquired', the optimistic father of the family, Darryl, decides to fight back. ... Further investigation reveals that the eviction comes from wealthy businessmen in cahoots with the government, 'It's a way of privatizing without privatizing'. ... The movie cleverly weaves in the point that interpersonal utility comparisons are invalid ..."

Videos


The Castle - Trailer, 10 Apr 1997
""You can't buy what I've got!" ... "But it's not a house, it's a home""