Lawyer, 1976 Libertarian Presidential candidate

Reference

Roger MacBride - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"Roger MacBride (6 August 1927 - 5 March 1995) was a U.S. lawyer, political figure, and television producer. He became the first presidential elector to cast a vote for a woman when, in 1972, he voted for the Libertarian Party candidates John Hospers for President and Theodora Nathan for Vice President. MacBride went on to be the Libertarian Party candidate for President in 1976. ..."

Born

6 Aug 1927, in New Rochelle, New York

Died

5 Mar 1995, in Miami Beach, Florida

Articles

Cast a Giant Ballot: Roger MacBride Made the Libertarian Party the Most Important Third Party in America, by Clifford F. Thies, The Freeman, Oct 1997
Memorial and biographical essay, discussing MacBride's influence on the early Libertarian Party as well as his involvement in the Little House saga
"The late Roger MacBride is perhaps best remembered as the person who brought Little House on the Prairie to television. ... he was the person who, through the casting of a single vote, transformed the fledgling Libertarian Party into the most important third party in America. ... As a young man, he wrote a scholarly little book, The American Electoral College, in which he presented his own views on our indirect method of voting for the president and vice president."
Roger MacBride (obituary), Libertarian Party News, Apr 1995
"MacBride was the adopted grandson of Rose Wilder Lane, daughter of 'Little House' author Laura Ingalls-Wilder. ... He also co-produced the popular 1970s television series, 'Little House on the Prairie.' ... In 1972, ... he made political history by casting his electoral vote for the Libertarian Party presidential ticket ..."
Rose Wilder Lane | Libertarianism.org, by Cato Institute, Mar 2003
Part of Cato's "Three Women Who Launched a Movement", celebrating during Women's History Month the sixtieth anniversary of the publication of The Discovery of Freedom (as well as Isabel Paterson and Ayn Rand books published in the same year)
"Her attorney Roger Lea MacBride, who she called her 'adopted grandson,' was inspired by her to write a series of sequels to the 'Little House' books, 'The Rose Years,' about Lane."
The 1977 Libertarian Party National Convention, by Tom G. Palmer and Tom Avery, Libertarian Review, Oct 1977
Recounts the main events of the convention, highlighting several of the speakers and their messages
"Roger MacBride followed with a broadside at the 'suppression of political ideas in America,' by both the government and the national media. The 1976 LP standard bearer noted that the major parties had loaded the election law to shoot down the independent candidates. MacBride also accused the national news media of being interested solely in personalities rather than ideas. Nonetheless, he pointed out, libertarians have begun to break through to the American people with their ideas and programs, and he pledged to do everything he could to help facilitate that."
The Legacy of Laura Ingalls Wilder, One of America’s First Libertarians, by David Boaz, Time, 9 May 2015
Focuses on Rose Wilder Lane's life and relates the influence of her mother, Laura Ingalls Wilder, as well as Wilder Lane's influence on Roger MacBride
"Also in 1943 Lane met Roger MacBride, the 14-year-old son of her editor at Reader's Digest. MacBride was fascinated by her ideas, visited her frequently at her Connecticut home, and came to think of himself as her 'adopted grandson.' After he published The Electoral College, a defense of that system, he was made a Republican elector in Virginia in 1972. The joke was on the Republicans: MacBride became a 'faithless elector'-faithless to Richard Nixon and Spiro Agnew, anyway, but faithful to the constitutional principles Rose Lane had instilled in him."
The Libertarian Legacy of Rose Wilder Lane, by Jeff Riggenbach, 14 Apr 2010
Biographical essay on both Rose Wilder Lane and Roger MacBride, transcript of "The Libertarian Tradition" podcast of 30 Mar 2010 titled "Roger MacBride and Rose Wilder Lane: A Libertarian Legacy"
"I first heard of him in 1972, when the reporters in newspapers and on radio and TV informed me that a renegade Republican elector from Virginia in the Electoral College, one Roger MacBride, had voted for John Hospers for president and Tonie Nathan for vice president ... MacBride, on the other hand, was a connection back to an earlier stage in the modern libertarian movement, which had gotten underway, not in the late 1960s, as I had thought, but in the 1940s, with the publication, during World War II, of four important libertarian books ..."
Total Victory: How Sweet It Is! [PDF], by Murray N. Rothbard, The Libertarian Forum, 1983
Lengthy account and commentary on the 1983 Libertarian Party presidential convention
"... it so happened that Roger MacBride, presidential candidate in 1976, who had displayed no interest whatever in the LP since his man Bill Hunscher was defeated by Ed Clark for the nomination in 1979, was holding a social gathering for friends of his in the LP the weekend before the convention at his summer home in Biddeford, Maine."

Books Authored

Bachelor Girl, 1999
Last of eight books on the early life of Rose Wilder
Related Topic: Rose Wilder Lane