Thirty-seventh President of the United States, infamous for the Watergate scandal

Reference

Richard Nixon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 - April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. He was also the 36th Vice President (1953-1961) serving under Dwight D. Eisenhower. Nixon redefined the office of Vice President, making it for the first time a high visibility platform and base for a presidential candidacy. He is the only person to have been elected twice to the Vice Presidency and twice to the Presidency, and the only president to have resigned that office. His resignation came in the face of imminent impeachment related to the Watergate scandal. ..."

Articles

George W. Bush's Nixonomics, by Gregory Bresiger, Mises Daily, 22 May 2006
"He was one of the enthusiastic fathers of the modern corporate welfare/warfare state: president Richard Nixon was first elected in 1968. ... the president's economic policies, his Nixonomics ... initially seemed to succeed, stabilizing the economy just long enough for President Nixon to be overwhelmingly re-elected in 1972."
35 Heroes of Freedom: Celebrating the people who have made the world groovier and groovier since 1968, Reason, Dec 2003
List of individuals who, according to Reason editors, have "have made the world a freer, better, and more libertarian place by example, invention, or action" (includes the unknown martyr of Tiananmen Square and a generic "The Yuppie")
"Between waging secret wars, enacting wage and price controls, and producing Watergate, Tricky Dick did more than any other single individual to encourage cynicism about government and wariness of presidential power."
Best of Both Worlds: Milton Friedman reminisces about his career as an economist and his lifetime "avocation" as a spokesman for freedom, by Brian Doherty, Reason, Jun 1995
Topics discussed include: the new Congress, flat taxes, the withholding tax, the people who influenced him, what led him to write about policy issues, libertarianism and how his political views have changed over the years
"... that shows why IQ is not a good measure. The highest IQ was Richard Nixon's and he was a terrible president. While I was never a governmental official, I was a member of an economic advisory group that Nixon appointed of which Arthur Burns was chairman. I saw Nixon from time to time when he was president, until he imposed price controls. I saw him only once after that."
Bureaucracy and the Civil Service in the United States, by Murray N. Rothbard, The Journal of Libertarian Studies, 1995
Historical account of the evolution of the United States Civil Service and attempts to reform it, from its beginnings through the early 20th century
"Hence, for example, the phenomenon of President Nixon, thinking he knew more than anyone else about the Vietnam War ... For the CIA and other intelligence warnings of what was going on, developed by many of the lower officers, were screened out by the higher-ups, for being contrary to the President's preferred line, i.e., that all was going well."
Cast a Giant Ballot: Roger MacBride Made the Libertarian Party the Most Important Third Party in America, by Clifford F. Thies, The Freeman, Oct 1997
Memorial and biographical essay, discussing MacBride's influence on the early Libertarian Party as well as his involvement in the Little House saga
"... Roger MacBrideā€™s vote for the Libertarian Party ticket was only partially motivated by philosophy. Following their re-election, Richard Nixon and Spiro Agnew were each forced to resign from office: Nixon for obstruction of justice in conjunction with the Watergate affair, and Agnew for tax evasion while governor of Maryland. MacBride was protesting their already obvious corruption as well as their policies."
Ellsberg's Lessons for Our Time, by James Bovard, Future of Freedom, May 2008
Reviews Daniel Ellsberg's Secrets: A Memoir of Vietnam and the Pentagon Papers and how its commentary applies to current conflicts
"The New York Times's publication of the Pentagon Papers was the big breakthrough. Nixon's Justice Department raced to get an injunction blocking publication, and later did the same when the Washington Post began publishing material Ellsberg sent it. ... The Nixon administration's rage and machinations were the best PR the Pentagon Papers could have received."
Related Topic: Vietnam War
Illegal Surveillance: A Real Security Threat, by James Bovard, 27 Feb 2006
Describes how the FBI, IRS and other agencies spied on Americans on both sides of the political spectrum during the 1960s and 1970s, and warns about the NSA wiretaps ordered by George W. Bush
"Other federal agencies also trampled citizens' privacy, rights, and lives during the late 1960s and early 1970s. The IRS used COINTELPRO leads to launch audits against thousands of suspected political enemies of the Nixon administration. The U.S. Army set up its own surveillance program, creating files on 100,000 Americans ..."
No More Great Presidents, by Robert Higgs, The Free Market, Mar 1997
Discusses the results of a 1996 poll of historians asking them to rank U.S. presidents, focusing on those ranked Great, Near Great and Failure, and offers his own ranking
"The Failures are Pierce, Buchanan, Andrew Johnson, Grant, Harding, Hoover, and Nixon, the last ranking at the very bottom of the heap. ... In contrast, of the eleven presidents ranked as Below Average or Failure, all but one (Nixon) managed to keep the nation at peace during their terms in office, and even Nixon ultimately extracted the United States from the quagmire of the war in Vietnam, though not until many more lives had been squandered."
The American Heritage of "Isolationism", by Gregory Bresiger, Future of Freedom, May 2006
"Richard Nixon ran in 1968 with 'a secret plan' to end the war in Vietnam. In the course of slowly pulling troops out of the war — and expanding the bombing — he spread the war to Cambodia."
The Secret State, by Carl Oglesby, 19 Dec 1991
Details various events from the establishment of the Gehlen Org after World War II to the 1991 death of Danny Casolaro that Oglesby says led to the creation of "a national-security oligarchy, a secret and invisible state within the public state"
"As though to give body to Helms' touching promise, seven CIA Operatives detailed to the Nixon White House played the same political game the CIA learned abroad in all its clandestine manipulations ... but now in the context of U.S. Presidential politics. Whether through sheer fluke or a subtle counter-conspiracy, Nixon's CIA burglars were caught in the act, and two years later Nixon was therefore forced to resign. For a moment, a window opened into the heart of darkness."
Treating People Like Garbage, by Sheldon Richman, 4 Oct 2013
Examines two examples at the micro and macro level of state behaviour towards people
"In 1971, President Nixon and National Security Adviser Henry Kissinger ... badly wanted to go to Red China to, among other reasons, exploit the conflict between China and the Soviet Union, and to overshadow the impending defeat in Vietnam. ... Who outfitted the military dictatorship's army knowing this slaughter would take place? Who kept doing so when it actually was taking place? And who offered private encouragement to Yahya? Nixon and Kissinger."
Related Topics: The State, Children
Under the Shadow of Inflationomics, by Hans F. Sennholz, Mises Daily, 1 Jun 2006
"... inflation breeds many evils and haunts many Americans who are rather unenlightened about its causes. A cursory look at presidential policies since 1971 corroborates the point. When wages and prices soared, President Nixon, with Congressional approval, imposed a four-phase program of wage and price controls which immediately led to shortages in many areas."
What Exactly Did Gerald Ford Heal?, by Sheldon Richman, 5 Jan 2007
Counters the argument that Geral Ford, by pardoning Richard Nixon, "healed the namtion"
"The break-in at the Democratic National Committee was not the only criminal activity that Nixon administration operatives had committed. They had also broken into the office of the psychiatrist of Daniel Ellsberg ... Nixon's infamous 'plumbers' unit had wiretapped people thought to be undermining the war effort. He also had used the IRS to harass people on his notorious enemies list."
Related Topics: Gerald Ford, Government