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Republican Party (United States) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"The Republican Party (also known as the 'GOP', for 'Grand Old Party') is one of the two major political parties in the United States' two-party system next to the Democratic Party. Presently, it is regarded as the more conservative of the two parties. The current president of the USA, George W. Bush, was nominated by the Republican Party. Although Bush has the most influence on the political course of the party, Ken Mehlman, not he, is the chairman of the Republican National Committee (since January 2005). Since 2002, the Republicans control the legislature at the federal level with a majority in the Senate and in the House of Representatives. Their symbol is the elephant, and the unofficial color is red. ..."

Articles

GOP, R.I.P?, by Sheldon Richman, 11 Feb 2008
Reviews conservatives' criticisms of John McCain and what it means for the Republican Party
"Who, then, can fault the conservatives for their opposition to McCain? Is no principle important enough to stand by it, even at the cost of electoral defeat? ... I agree with the conservatives in this respect: a Republican party that nominates John McCain for president is unfit to exist. The sooner it is demolished, the better."
Related Topic: John McCain
Libertarian GOP defection?, by Bruce Bartlett, The Washington Times, 13 Dec 2006
"The new Republican Puritans don't trust people ... They want the government to impose itself on peoples' lives and deny them freedom of choice. ... Moreover, Republicans have lost whatever credibility they once had on economics by indulging in an orgy of spending and corruption ..."
The GOP, RIP: They're on the way out — and good riddance, by Justin Raimondo, 8 Sep 2006
"For a good 75 years, the Republican Party has been the party of conservatism, the anointed vehicle for the hopes and dreams of those who believe in limited government and seek to preserve the legacy of the Founding Fathers. No more. It hasn't been true for quite a while, but at least the Republicans were rhetorically committed to conservative principles right up until the second Bush presidency."
Related Topic: Militarism
The Ominous Republican Hold on Congress, by Sheldon Richman, 7 Jan 2015
Comments on what may be expected from the Republican-controlled Senate in 2015
"... those who abhor war will awaken each day knowing that hawkish Sens. John McCain, Lindsey Graham, Ted Cruz, and their ilk are in control. ... The congressional Republicans can also be expected to block Obama's proposal to normalize relations with Cuba. ... Finally, the Republicans undoubtedly will try to stop Obama from deferring the deportations of some five million people who are in this country without government permission."
Related Topics: Iran, Israel, Barack Obama
They Deserved to Lose, by Jacob G. Hornberger, 8 Nov 2006
"... the Republicans ... should be ashamed of themselves because they have greatly shamed and damaged our country. ... while they love to preach the concept of individual responsibility to others, never ever do they apply the concept to themselves. ... Republicans continue to wrap themselves in libertarian limited-government rhetoric. It is hypocrisy like that makes the Republican loss a deserving one."
Related Topic: Democratic Party
Why I Am Not a 'Conservative', by Vin Suprynowicz, 13 Jun 2006
"But after the Republicans came surging back 20-odd years ago, vowing to close down the wasteful and counterproductive federal Departments of Energy and Education (it would have been a good start) — they did none of it. Never even tried. In 22 years they have repealed no significant infringement of the Second Amendment, closed no significant federal agency or program."
Related Topic: Democratic Party
Why the Republicans Are Doomed, by Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr., 21 Feb 2007
Discusses recent Republican behavior at both the presidential (George W. Bush) and grassroots level, arguing that they take their societal view from Hobbes
"What's interesting here is what motivates big-government Republicanism. The party itself has no strong investment in the public sector as it currently stands, apart from the prison bureaucracy and the military. ... Republicans, essentially, see the public purse as something not to conserve but to rob and give to those who do vote Republican."
Related Topics: Liberty, Society, The State
Big-Spending Republicans Can Learn from Ireland's Reforms, by Benjamin Powell, 17 Sep 2003
Contrasts U.S. government spending in the 1990's and early 2000's with the approach taken in Ireland from the late 1980's
"Despite some tax cuts, the size of the U.S. government has increased rapidly under President Bush and the Republican-controlled Congress. ... Under the Republican Congress during Clinton's years in office, spending jumped from $1.46 trillion to approximately $1.74 trillion — an increase of just under $300 billion. ... Despite strong rhetoric leading up to the 2000 election, pairing a Republican president with a Republican Congress has done nothing to reverse this trend."
Give Me Liberty, by Rose Wilder Lane, 1936
Originally published as an article titled "Credo" in the Saturday Evening Post; describes her experiences in and history of Soviet Russia and Europe, contrasting them with the history of the United States, emphasizing the individualist themes
"The Republican Party remains a political mechanism with no political principle. It does not stand for American individualism. Its leaders continue to play the 70-year-old American professional sport of vote-getting, called politics. ... A vote for the New Deal approves national socialism, but a vote for the Republican Party does not repudiate national socialism."
Glorious War!, by Joseph Sobran, The Reactionary Utopian, 31 Aug 2006
Discusses how the Republican Party and conservatism became associated with militarism and war
"May the Republicans perish forever. May vultures gobble their entrails. May their name be blotted out. In short, may they lose their shirts in November. Yes, I'm disillusioned with the GOP. It was bad enough when I thought they were unprincipled. Now, however, it's worse, because they do have a principle after all: war. Two Bush administrations have proved that. War on Panama, war on Iraq, war on 'terror,' war on Afghanistan, war on Iraq again, and war on Iran, comin' up."
Related Topics: War, George W. Bush, Conservatism
Hookers and family values - the GOP's strange bedfellows, by Brock N. Meeks, 9 Aug 1996
Comments on the behind-the-scenes activities at the 1996 GOP presidential nominating convention
"When it comes to drugs, the GOP apparently knows how to party as well. One need look no further than the convention keynote speaker, Representative Susan Molinari of New York, to get a whiff of this. The congresswoman was the subject of a recent New York Observer article which detailed her college pot-smoking days."
Related Topic: Norma Jean Almodovar
Interview with Karl Hess, by A. Lin Neumann, Reason, May 1982
Topics discussed include the Republican Party, National Review, AEI, Goldwater, Rothbard, anarchism, the Vietnam War, Carter and Reagan, fascism, urban enterprise zones, the environment, and authoritarianism vs. freedom
"I went to work for the Republican National Committee—I forget how old I was then, but I was just a teenager. ... By the time I got to be an official grown-up, the Republican Party was pretty well divided into a tiny minority of old Taft-type conservatives and libertarians—people like Frank Chodorov and others—and the new big-business, Cold War faction of the party. By the time Eisenhower knocked off Taft, the idea of the Republican Party as pro-individual and pro-enterprise was pretty much over with. But by that time the Cold War was so popular that those seemed almost trivial matters."
Keeping Libertarians Inside the Tent: Alienation avoidance, by Randy E. Barnett, National Review Online, 22 Nov 2002
Responds to New York Times 16 Nov 2002 op-ed by John Miller complaining that Libertarians are "Democratic Party operatives" by offering suggestions that would make the Republican candidates more appealing to libertarian voters
"... many of my libertarian friends and relatives ... view the Republican party as cavalier about individual liberty, supporting big government when it serves their purposes as much as Democrats do when it serves theirs. What conservative Republicans often fail to realize is that libertarians are an important constituency that should not be ignored or taken for granted lest their votes be driven to the Libertarian party or even to the Democrats."
Pentagon Whistle-Blower on the Coming War With Iran, by Karen Kwiatkowski, 27 Feb 2007
Interviewed by James Harris and Josh Scheer of Truthdig; topics include possible conflict with Iran, the Pentagon situation prior to the March 2003 invasion of Iraq, the Office of Special Plans, Vietnam, terrorism and neoconservatism
"So now [the neoconservatives are] in the Republican party, and absolutely, this happened, late 1970s. so it is not, these are not the Republicans that we grew up thinking about, but they are in the Republican party now. Of course the Republican party now isn't anything like what I thought it was, it's certainly no Goldwater party, it's a party of big spending, it's a party of corruption. What do you want me to say? They love big government, they haven't seen a big government plan they didn’t like."
Ron Paul's Goldwater Moment: He's a Republican, he's antiwar - and the Establishment is deathly afraid of him, by Justin Raimondo, 11 May 2007
Critiques Washington-centric "conventional wisdom" about Ron Paul's presidential candidacy
"Paul could conjure a Goldwater moment and revitalize his party. All he has to do is mount a visible challenge to the sterile neoconservative orthodoxy. ... A Republican victory in the next presidential election seems unlikely no matter who wins the nomination: if Republicans can't win the White House this time around, perhaps they'll be content with winning back their own souls."
Related Topic: Ron Paul
The Economic Costs of Going to War: Transcript: Bill Moyers Talks with Lew Rockwell, NOW with Bill Moyers, 7 Mar 2003
Topics discussed include: the economy, the federal budget deficit, the national debt, inflation, Republican vs. Democrat presidents, tax cuts, war spending, World War II and the depression, Sadam Hussein and unemployment
"If we look at the facts and not the rhetoric, Republicans expand the government much more than Democrats do. If you look at the Reagan administration, the Nixon administration, both Bush administrations, [they're] all big government operation. The smallest government guy in recent times, Jimmy Carter. Even Clinton was a smaller government guy than George Bush."
The Fraudulent Meaning of Elections, by James Bovard, Future of Freedom, Apr 2006
Examines the arguments raised in the debate between Democrats and Republicans in Congress over the certification of the 2005 Ohio Electoral College voters
"The Republicans' comments sounded as if there is a grave danger in letting people even start to think about how the whole process works — as if Republicans were terrified of any questions or challenges that would decrease people's submissiveness to the government."
Related Topic: Voting
The Power of Persuasion, by Jeff Riggenbach, Mises Daily, 20 May 2011
Historical account of the Persuasion magazine, edited by Joan Kennedy Taylor between Sept 1964 and May 1968
"What they were interested in was a collection of issues that included the right to own gold and the abolition of the military draft. 'These were different enough,' Joan recalled, that people had trouble figuring out whether to 'place us in the liberal wing or the conservative wing of the Republicans.' ... On the contrary, she would likely have retorted (as she did years later) that she and her friends were merely 'a group of New Yorkers who had become convinced that it might be possible to support laissez-faire capitalism from within the Republican Party.'"
War Loses, Again, by Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr., 8 Nov 2006
Reflects on the results of the 2006 U.S. mid-term elections
"It's a pathetic fact that the Republican Party squandered yet another opportunity to make a difference for the good in this country. They forever promise freedom but forever deliver despotism. They might have shrunk government, really cut taxes, balanced the budget, reformed money, freed up trade, or decentralized government. Instead, they threw it all away to defend an indefensible war."
Will the Democrats Become Part of the Problem?, by Paul Craig Roberts, 10 Nov 2006
Discusses the outcome of the 2006 U.S. mid-term elections and offers recommendations primarily for congressional Democrats
"It only took six years for Americans to comprehend George Bush and the Republican Party and to realize that the Republicans were not leading America in any promising directions. ... The lust for unbridled power proved to be too strong a temptation for normally cautious Republicans. The Republicans waved the flag and shouted 'terrorist sympathizer' at every civil libertarian who attempted to defend the US Constitution ... and a president who behaved — with the approval of Republicans — as if he were above the law."

Cartoons and Comic Strips

Gosh, I wonder how we got here?, by Chuck Asay, Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph, 10 Nov 2006
Was it the war or the scandal?, by Chip Bok, Akron Beacon Journal, 10 Nov 2006
G.O.P. on Immigration, by Tony Auth, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 3 Jan 2008
Related Topic: Statue of Liberty