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  • Liberty, in politics, consists of the social, political and economic freedoms to which all community members are entitled. In philosophy, liberty involves free will as contrasted with determinism. In theology, liberty is freedom from the effects of, "sin, spiritual servitude, [or] worldly ties".

    Generally, liberty is distinctly differentiated from freedom in that freedom is primarily, if not exclusively, the ability to do as one wills and what one has the power to do; whereas liberty concerns the absence of arbitrary restraints and takes into account the rights of all involved. As such, the exercise of liberty is subject to capability and limited by the rights of others.

    Liberty entails the responsible use of freedom under the rule of law without depriving anyone else of their freedom. Freedom is more broad in that it represents a total lack of restraint or the unrestrained ability to fulfill one's desires.

    For example, a person can have the freedom to murder, but not have the liberty to murder, as the latter example deprives others of their liberty to not be harmed.

    Liberty can be reduced as a form of punishment for a crime. In many countries, prisons can deprive criminals of their rights to certain actions enjoyed by non-criminals as a form of punishment.

    This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "Liberty" as of 18 Jun 2018, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.