1997 Oscar-nominated documentary about the 1993 siege of the Branch Davidians in Waco, Texas

Waco: The Rules of Engagement is a 1997 documentary directed by William Gazecki about the 1993 "Waco Siege", a 51-day standoff beginning with the 28 February Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms assault on the Branch Davidian church and home outside of Waco, Texas and ending with the 19 April Federal Bureau of Investigations assault on the building which killed most of the inhabitants. The film was spearheaded by Second Amendment activist turned filmmaker Michael McNulty who spent twenty-eight months and $400,000 developing the film. Later former CNN business news reporter Dan Gifford and his wife Amy Sommer Gifford came in as co-producers, supplying almost another one million dollars. Director William Gazecki joined McNulty in traveling the country to interview and film participants for the film. Gifford, Gazecki and McNulty wrote the script.

Video Products

Waco: The Rules of Engagement (1997), 9 Dec 2003

Reviews

Waco: Rules of Engagement (1997)
    by Jon Osborne, Miss Liberty's Guide to Film and Video, 2001
"If you ever wondered what actually happened in Waco, why and how the government was able to kill dozens of people who had never been convicted of anything, watch this film. Step by step, the government's version of the story is unraveled, and in its place is left a holocaust that can only be attributed to an incredible abuse of state power."
Waco: The Rules of Engagement (1997), by Stephen W. Carson
"This documentary covers the events of February 28-April 19, 1993 at Waco, Texas that resulted in a total of eighty-six deaths. Called the Waco Siege or Waco Massacre, it is an amazing illustration of the principle that every command and regulation of the state is backed up by deadly force."

The introductory paragraph uses material from the Wikipedia article "Waco: The Rules of Engagement" as of 29 Jun 2018, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.