The human unalienable right from which other rights obtain
  • Children - Sons and daughters; young persons, infants, adolescents
  • Evolution - The process of gradual transformation of living organisms over time
  • Health - The general condition of the body; freedom from physical disease or pain
  • Learning - The process of acquiring knowledge or skills
  • Personal Responsibility - Accepting the consequences of one's actions
  • Philosophy - The study of questions about existence, knowledge and ethics
  • Praxeology - The study of purposeful human action
  • Psychology - The sudy of the mind and of human behavior
  • Self-ownership - The principle that each individual owns his or her body and life

Reference

Life - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"Life is a multi-faceted concept that may refer to the ongoing process of which living things are a part or the period between fertilisation or mitosis and death. ..."
Right to life - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"Right to life or Pro-life, in its broadest sense, refers to holding human life as a paramount value. The right to life is central to debates on the issues of abortion, capital punishment, euthanasia, and, to a somewhat lesser extent, war. The United States Declaration of Independence calls life one of the "unalienable rights," meaning that our sense of self-preservation cannot be separated from the human psyche. ..."

Articles

Alternative Medicine Is Libertarian Medicine, by Butler Shaffer, 2 Dec 2006
Discusses several aspects of healthcare, including self-ownership, being responsible for our own care, decentralised information, the collapse of external authorities and the dehumanizing decisions resulting from institutionalized healthcare
"What is 'life,' and what is it not? Those who prattle about the 'sanctity of life' often overlook the fact that 'life' is self-directed activity; that all of politics is premised upon forcing life to go in directions it does not choose to go; and, therefore, that all of politics is anti-life. Thus have we born witness to the contradictory and confused babblings of people who pretend to be 'pro-life,' even as they whoop up campaigns for war and capital punishment."
A Passion for Life, by Butler Shaffer, 1 Nov 2003
"If life is to be experienced as our nature has prepared us, we must learn to live with passion; with a sense of focused, self-directed energy. The study of economics reminds us that life is a subjective process of learning, making choices, taking actions. ... To live with passion is to live an internally directed life that exhibits a fiery, creative, exploring spirit."
Herbert Spencer's Theory of Causation [PDF], by George H. Smith, The Journal of Libertarian Studies, 1981
Discusses Spencer's epistemology, his views on causation and how it affects social interactions, concluding with his ethical theory and concept of justice
"Life, in general terms, is 'the continuous adjustment of internal relations to external relations.' An organism is continuously striving to adapt to its external environment. This requires that it be able to discriminate, if only on a rudimentary level, between different kinds of stimuli. If it is to survive, it must be able to react differently in different circumstances."
Liberty Defined, by Floyd A. 'Baldy' Harper, 4 Sep 1957
Speech to the Mont Pelerin Society; Harper first offers his definition of liberty, then explores "adulterated" definitions, its relation to morals, moral law and basic humans rights, ending with his hope for the cause of liberty
"Another derivative of biological research is to bring into focus the independent, unitary nature of the human organism. Persons are born alone as distinctly separate units, one at a time. They likewise die one at a time as separate units. All their acts in between are as separate units as well, even in their cooperative endeavors. An aggregation of any sort — even this meeting — fails to blend even two persons into one unit, so long as there is life in each."
Rationality and Irrationality; Subjectivism and Objectivity of Praxeological Research, by Ludwig von Mises, Human Action
Chapter 1, "Acting Man", section 4; argues that all human action is rational, i.e., the outcome of reasonable deliberation
"The impulse to live, to preserve one's own life, and to take advantage of every opportunity of strengthening one's vital forces is a primal feature of life, present in every living being. However, ... man has the power to master even these impulses. He can control both his sexual desires and his will to live. He can give up his life when the conditions under which alone he could preserve it seem intolerable. ... To live is for man the outcome of a choice, of a judgment of value."
Related Topic: Economics
The Death of Politics, by Karl Hess, Playboy, Mar 1969
Discusses libertarianism, contrasting it with both conservatism and modern liberalism, including specific policy differences
"Libertarianism is the view that each man is the absolute owner of his life, to use and dispose of as he sees fit: ... and that respect for every other man's similar and equal ownership of life and, by extension, the property and fruits of that life, is the ethical basis of a humane and open society. ... the libertarian vision ... sees man as capable of moving on without the encumbering luggage of laws and politics that do not merely preserve man's right to his life but attempt, in addition, to tell him how to live it."
The Economics of Self-Ownership, by Michael S. Rozeff, Mises Daily, 6 Sep 2005
"Making one's own choices is an essential procedure in learning how to create one's life. Human life is not simply a series of disconnected acts because we possess memory, foresight, reason, and many other qualities. One may engage in several series of decisions that build up skills, training, knowledge, wealth, personal relationships, health, family, character, reputation, spirituality, etc. ..."
Related Topic: Self-ownership
The Humanitarian with the Guillotine, by Isabel Paterson, The Freeman, Sep 1955
Reprinted from The God of the Machine, 1943; analyses the negative consequences of "humanitarians" (or professional philanthropists) and politicians act to provide relief to the needy
"The fatal divergence occurs in failing to recognize the norm of human life. Obviously there is a great deal of pain and distress incidental to existence. Poverty, illness, and accident are possibilities which may be reduced to a minimum, but cannot be altogether eliminated from the hazards mankind must encounter. ... That is the norm and the natural order. Ills are marginal. They can be alleviated from the marginal surplus of production; otherwise nothing at all could be done."
Winning the Battle for Freedom and Prosperity, by John Mackey, Liberty, Jun 2006
Updated from speech given at FreedomFest 2004; after a brief background on himself, Mackey criticises the freedom movement from a marketing and branding perspective and suggests a different approach by de-emphasising some issues and prioritising others
"Finally at the top of this hierarchy is self-actualization ... : 'Be all you can be.' This means reaching your fullest potential as a human being. I believe that one of life's purposes is fundamentally to learn and grow. If we move up Maslow's hierarchy and don't stagnate at lower levels, life becomes an adventure of learning, growing, loving, and rejoicing. If we are not growing as human beings, then we are diminishing."

Books

Life 101: Everything We Wish We Had Learned About Life in School--But Didn't, by Peter McWilliams, Apr 1990
Electronic text available at author's site
Related Topic: Learning
The Examined Life: Philosophical Meditations
    by Robert Nozick, 1989
Partial contents: Dying - Parents and Children - Creating - The Nature of God, The Nature of Faith - The Holiness of Everyday Life - Sexuality - Love's Bond - Emotions - Happiness - Focus - Being More Real - Selflessness - Stances - Value and Meaning