Individuals who organize and assume the risks of a business
  • Bidwell, Robert E. - Business management and turnaround specialist, author, professor
  • Branson, Richard - Founder and chairman of Virgin Group, Ltd.
  • Cobden, Richard - Nineteenth century British politician, leading proponent of free trade
  • Cuban, Mark - American entrepreneur, owner of the Dallas Mavericks and other businesses
  • Frezza, William A. - Founder and President of Wireless Computing Associates, General Partner in Adams Capital Management
  • Fylstra, Daniel H. - President of Frontline Systems, founder of VisiCorp
  • Garvey, Olive W. - American businesswoman, chairman of the board of Garvey, Inc.
  • Hancock, John - Signer of the U.S. Declaration of Independence, president of the Second Continental Congress
  • Johnson, Gary E. - 2016 and 2012 Libertarian Party U.S. presidential candidate, former governor of New Mexico (1995-2003)
  • Koch, David - Executive VP of Koch Industries, 1980 Libertarian Vice Presidential candidate
  • Mackey, John - Founder, Chairman of the Board and CEO of Whole Foods Market, Inc.
  • Morris, Robert - Signer of the U.S. Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation and Constitution
  • Rodgers, T. J. - Co-founder and CEO of Cypress Semiconductor Corp.
  • Root, Wayne Allyn - Sports handicapper, co-founder, chairman and CEO of GWIN Inc.
  • Thiel, Peter A. - Co-founder and former CEO of PayPal
  • Tiemann, Michael - Co-founder of Cygnus Solutions; Vice President, Open Source Affairs for Red Hat Inc.

Articles

Cantillon for Laymen, by Karen De Coster, Mises Daily, 7 Jun 2006
"... throughout the Essai, there are at least 110 separate references to the word 'entrepreneur' .... This term is thought to have been first used by Cantillon ... Cantillon visualizes the entrepreneur as being a risk-taker, dealing with uncertain returns in a market where prices and quantities are non-fixed and unknown."
Related Topic: Richard Cantillon
Talkers versus doers, by Thomas Sowell, 9 Jun 2004
"Why can't the talkers leave the doers alone? Perhaps it is because that would leave the talkers on the sidelines, with their uselessness being painfully obvious to all, instead of being in the limelight and 'making a difference' — even if that difference is usually negative."
Talkers versus doers, Part II, by Thomas Sowell, 10 Jun 2004
"The fact that benefits have costs means that those who create these benefits are tempting targets for accusations from those who know how to dramatize the costs. ... most people have not been taught to weigh costs against benefits or to subject hot rhetoric to cold logic."