Seventh President of the United States
Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson (15 March 1767 – 8 June 1845) was an American soldier and statesman who served as the seventh president of the United States from 1829 to 1837. Before being elected to the presidency, Jackson gained fame as a general in the United States Army and served in both houses of Congress. As president, Jackson sought to advance the rights of the "common man" against a "corrupt aristocracy" and to preserve the Union.

Born

15 Mar 1767, in Waxhaw, South Carolina

Died

8 Jun 1845, in Nashville, Tennessee

Articles

Bureaucracy and the Civil Service in the United States, by Murray Rothbard, The Journal of Libertarian Studies, 1995
Historical account of the evolution of the United States Civil Service and attempts to reform it, from its beginnings through the early 20th century
"Jackson, an ardent Jeffersonian and Old Republican, was, like other Jacksonian leaders, dedicated to a new Democratic Party that would restore original Jeffersonian Republican principles of laissez-faire and ultra-minimal government. Jackson followed Jefferson in managing, for the second and presumably the last time in American history, to repay the national debt ..."
States' Rights vs. Monetary Monopoly, by Thomas DiLorenzo, 9 May 2003
Recounts the story of how various states and Andrew Jackson maneuvered against the second Bank of the United States (BUS) eventually causing it not to be re-chartered
"Americans once utilized ... states' rights traditions of nullification and interposition to assist President Andrew Jackson in his campaign to veto the re-chartering of the Second Bank of the United States (BUS) in 1832. Jackson essentially ended central banking in America until it was revived thirty years later by the Lincoln administration. ... Andrew Jackson essentially said 'thank you for your opinion' and then thumbed his nose at the Court when it ruled that the BUS was constitutional. ... Andrew Jackson is usually given credit for (temporarily) ending central banking in America in the nineteenth century."

The introductory paragraph uses material from the Wikipedia article "Andrew Jackson" as of 21 May 2018, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.