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Where Can You Find Freedom Today?

Manuscript attributed to Lǎozǐ that is the foundational text of philosophical and religious Daoism

Table of Contents

PREFACE xi
INTRODUCTION
I. Was Tâoism older than Lâo-𝔷ze? 1
II. The Texts of the Tâo Teh King and Kwang-𝔷ze Shû, as regards their authenticity and genuineness, and the arrangement of them 4
III. What is the meaning of the name Tâo? and the chief points of belief in Tâoism 12
IV. Accounts of Lâo-𝔷ze and Kwang-𝔷ze given by Sze-mâ Khien 33
V. On the Tractate of Actions and their Retributions 38
The Tâo Teh King
Part I 45
1 Embodying the Tâo 47
2 The Nourishment of the Person 47
3 Keeping the People at Rest 49
4 The Fountainless 49
5 The Use of Emptiness 50
6 The Completion of Material Forms 51
7 Sheathing the Light 52
8 The Placid and Contented Nature 52
9 Fulness and Complacency contrary to the Tâo 53
10 Possibilities through the Tâo 53
11 The Use of what has no Substantive Existence 54
12 The Repression of the Desires 55
13 Loathing Shame 56
14 The Manifestation of the Mystery 57
15 The Exhibition of the Qualities of the Tâo 58
16 Returning to the Root 59
17 The Unadulterated Influence 60
18 The Decay of Manners 61
19 Returning to the Unadulterated Influence 62
20 Being Different from Ordinary Men 62
21 The Empty Heart, or the Tâo in its Operation 64
22 The Increase granted to Humility 65
23 Absolute Vacancy 65
24 Painful Graciousness 67
25 Representations of the Mystery 67
26 The Quality of Gravity 69
27 Dexterity in Using the Tâo 70
28 Returning to Simplicity 71
29 Taking no Action 71
30 A Caveat against War 72
31 Stilling War 73
32 The Tâo with no Name 74
33 Discriminating between Attributes 75
34 The Task of Achievement 76
35 The Attribute of Benevolence 77
36 Minimising the Light 78
37 The Exercise of Government 79
Part II 80
38 About the Attributes of the Tâo 80
39 The Origin of the Law 82
40 Dispensing with the Use (of Means) 83
41 Sameness and Difference 84
42 The Transformations of the Tâo 85
43 The Universal Use (of the Action in Weakness of the Tâo) 87
44 Cautions 87
45 Great or Overflowing Virtue 88
46 The Moderating of Desire or Ambition 88
47 Surveying what is Far-off 89
48 Forgetting Knowledge 90
49 The Quality of Indulgence 91
50 The Value set on Life 92
51 The Operation (of the Tâo) in Nourishing Things 93
52 Returning to the Source 94
53 Increase of Evidence 96
54 The Cultivation (of the Tâo), and the Observation (of its Effects) 97
55 The Mysterious Charm 99
56 The Mysterious Excellence 100
57 The Genuine Influence 100
58 Transformation according to Circumstances 101
59 Guarding the Tâo 102
60 Occupying the Throne 103
61 The Attribute of Humility 104
62 Practising the Tâo 105
63 Thinking in the Beginning 106
64 Guarding the Minute 107
65 Pure, unmixed Excellence 108
66 Putting One's Self Last 109
67 Three Precious Things 110
68 Matching Heaven 111
69 The Use of the Mysterious (Tâo) 112
70 The Difficulty of being (rightly) Known 112
71 The Disease of Knowing 113
72 Loving One's Self 114
73 Allowing Men to take their Course 116
74 Restraining Delusion 117
75 How Greediness Injures 117
76 A Warning against (Trusting in) Strength 118
77 The Way of Heaven 119
78 Things to be Believed 120
79 Adherence to Bond or Covenant 121
80 Standing Alone 122
81 The Manifestation of Simplicity 123

Articles

China's Legacy: The Thoughts of Lao Tzu, by James A. Dorn, South China Morning Post, 4 Sep 2007
Contrasts the teachings of Laozi with respect to government intervention with the lingering effects of Mao Zedong's legacy
In writing the Dao De Jing [Lao Tzu] argued that if governments followed the principle of wu‐​wei (non‐​action), social and economic harmony would naturally emerge and people would prosper. The essence of this liberal vision is concisely stated in Chapter 57: "The more restrictions and limitations there are, the more impoverished men will be ... The more rules and precepts are enforced, the more bandits and crooks will be produced. Hence, we have the words of the wise [ruler]: Through my non‐​action, men are spontaneously transformed. Through my quiescence, men spontaneously become tranquil ..."
Related Topics: China, Government, Lǎozǐ

Books

Te-Tao Ching (Modern Library)
    by Lǎozǐ, 1993
Translated and with and introduction by Robert G. Henricks; partial contents: The Ma-wang-tui Manuscripts of the Lao-tzu and Other Versions of the Text - The Philosophy of Lao-tzu - Translator's Note - Te (Virtue) - Tao (The Way)