Territory in eastern Europe, ruled since 1991 by the republic of Uryad Ukrayiny

Reference

Ukraine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"Ukraine (Ukrainian: Україна, transliterated: Ukrayina; Russian: Украи́на; Crimean Tatar: Ukraina) is a country in Central and Eastern Europe. Ukraine borders the Russian Federation to the east and northeast, Belarus to the northwest, Poland, Slovakia and Hungary to the west, Romania and Moldova to the southwest, and the Black Sea and Sea of Azov to the south and southeast, respectively. It has an area of 603,628 km², making it the second largest contiguous country on the European continent, after the Russian Federation. ..."

Birthplace of

Ludwig von Mises, Ludwig Heinrich Edler von Mises, in Lemberg (Lviv), on 29 Sep 1881

Measures of Freedom

Human Freedom Index [PDF], The Human Freedom Index 2016
2014: 6.41, Rank: 111, Personal Freedom: 6.81, Economic Freedom: 6.00, Democracy Index: 5.08
Level of Economic Freedom, Economic Freedom of the World
2014: 6.00, Rank: 135
Ukraine | Freedom House, Freedom in the World 2016
2016: Status: Partly Free, Aggregate Score: 61, Political Rights: 3, Civil Liberties: 3
"Conditions in Ukraine stabilized somewhat in 2015 compared with the previous year, which included the Euromaidan protests, the downfall of President Viktor Yanukovych, Russia's occupation of Crimea and invasion of the Donbas, and presidential and parliamentary elections. With Crimea still held by Russia and continued fighting between government forces and Russian-backed separatists in eastern Ukraine, President Petro Poroshenko's top priority was restoring the country's territorial integrity and peace within its borders."

Articles

Democracy: The God That Failed: In Iraq, Ukraine, and Kyrgyzstan, by Justin Raimondo, 12 Oct 2005
"The 'Orange Revolution' has turned sour on its enthusiasts, as Yushchenko and his former ally, Yulia Tymoshenko, the 'gas princess,' turn on each other ... In Ukraine, a corrupt and neo-socialistic gang was replaced by an equally corrupt and authoritarian crew, albeit one with Western connections."
Related Topics: Democracy, Iraq, Kyrgyzstan
How Americans Can Help Ukrainians, by Sheldon Richman, 13 Mar 2014
Suggests opening U.S. borders to allow Ukrainians (and others) to immigrate and thus help defuse the situation in their country
"Respecting the freedom to move would not only help the individuals who choose to exercise it; it might also have benefits in Ukraine itself. The kleptocrats of all parties, who have used Ukraine like their personal milch cow, might finally realize their folly if they witnessed an exodus of their most enterprising and ambitious residents. ... So forget guaranteeing loans to corrupt government officials. Forget facing down the Russians over Crimea."
Let's Have Candor from the NATO Summit, by Sheldon Richman, 4 Sep 2014
Comments on an article by foreign policy scholar John Mearsheimer about the crisis in the Ukraine
"After the Soviet empire fell, Ukraine had governments friendly to the West, but in 2010, Viktor Yanukovych, who did not view Russia as an adversary, was elected president. ... When Yanukovych balked at an economic offer from the European Union in favor of a deal with Russia, antigovernment demonstrations, encouraged by U.S. officials who wanted regime change, took place in Kiev, and pressure ratcheted up until Yanukovych fled the country."
Obama Should Steer Clear of Ukraine, by Sheldon Richman, 26 Feb 2014
Discusses the 2014 situation in Ukraine, pronouncements from President Obama and effects of potential intervention
"What's happening in Ukraine is sad. The country is divided between those who want closer ties to Western Europe and those who want closer ties to Russia. ... the Russia-leaning president, Viktor Yanukovich, has fled the capital, while the parliament has named an interim replacement. To make things worse, outsiders won't keep their hands off."
Tear Down the Trade Walls, by Sheldon Richman, 22 Apr 2005
Reflections on free trade sparked by Ukrainian president Yushchenko's remarks to the U.S. Congress
"'Please tear down this wall,' the president said. No, it wasn't President Reagan challenging Soviet President Gorbachev about the Berlin Wall in the 1980s. It was the Ukrainian president, Viktor Yushchenko ... [He] was asking the [U.S.] senators and representatives to remove the wall that keeps nearly 49 million Ukrainians from freely selling their metals, minerals, electronics, chemicals, and vegetables to Americans."
Related Topic: Free Trade