Annual awards granted by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in various categories

The Academy Awards, also known as the Oscars, are a set of 24 awards for artistic and technical merit in the film industry, given annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), to recognize excellence in cinematic achievements as assessed by the Academy's voting membership. The various category winners are awarded a copy of a golden statuette, officially called the "Academy Award of Merit", although more commonly referred to by its nickname "Oscar". The award was originally sculpted by George Stanley from a design sketch by Cedric Gibbons. AMPAS first presented it in 1929 at a private dinner hosted by Douglas Fairbanks in the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel.

Home Page

Oscar.com
Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, granted by Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
Academy Award for Best Picture, granted by Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

Articles

Arts and Movies [PDF], by Murray Rothbard (Mr. First Nighter), The Libertarian Forum, Jan 1973
Reviews the movies of 1972 and offers recommendations for the best (for the record, Godfather won Best Picture, Brando won Best Actor --but refused it, Coppola and Duvall were nominated for Best Director/Supporting Actor but did not win)
"Certainly the best film of 1972 was The Godfather, which we have already hailed in these pages. The Godfather is us classicists' candidate in the award sweepstakes. ... Best director and best picture awards should usually run together, and so Francis Ford Coppola gets our accolade. For best actor it's for me a tossup between Al Pacino and Marlon Brando in our favorite movie. For best suo~ortine'actor. Robert Duval! will probably get the Academy Award for his consigliori in The Godfather (even the New York Film Critics selected Duvall), but far superior are two splendid performances by British actors in Frenzy ..."
Related Topic: The Godfather
Those Awards, by Murray Rothbard, The Rothbard-Rockwell Report, Jan 1994
Commentary about the Oscars, with negative remarks about Schindler's List, which Rothbard admits not seeing, and The Piano
"... it is already too clear that the fix is in, even more than usual, on the Academy Awards. ... The Oscars have increasingly taken on the dimensions of a racket. ... The major studios have always had special previews for Academy members (i.e., Oscar voters) for the pictures they are hyping for the awards; now, that has been supplemented by videocassettes expressed to the homes of each voter."

The introductory paragraph uses material from the Wikipedia article "Academy Awards" as of 24 Oct 2018, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.