Lawyer, 1980 United States Presidential candidate for the Libertarian Party
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  • Edward E. Clark (born 4 May 1930) is an American lawyer and politician who ran for Governor of California in 1978, and for President of the United States as the nominee of the Libertarian Party in the 1980 presidential election.

    Reference

    Clark, Ed (1930-), by David Boaz, The Encyclopedia of Libertarianism, 15 Aug 2008
    Biographical essay
    "Edward Emerson Clark is an attorney and the 1980 Libertarian Party presidential nominee. Ed Clark, a corporate attorney in New York and Los Angeles, opposed the Vietnam War while remaining a Republican, but when President Richard Nixon imposed wage and price controls in 1972, he joined the Libertarian Party and quickly became a member of its national committee and California State Chair. In 1978, he stood as the Libertarian candidate for governor of California, winning 377,960 votes, or about 5.5% of the total cast. That success led to his selection as the party's 1980 presidential nominee."

    Born

    4 May 1930, Edward E. Clark, in Middleborough, Massachusetts

    Associations

    Board of Advisors, Advocates for Self-Government

    Web Pages

    Libertarian Party: History: Presidential & Vice-Presidential Candidates: 1980: Clark/Koch
    "Presidential Candidate: Ed Clark; Vice Presidential Candidate: David Koch; On the ballot: 50 states plus D.C.; Votes: 921,199; Campaign Book: A New Beginning"
    Related Topic: Libertarian Party

    Articles

    Clark For President - A Report on the 1980 Libertarian Presidential Campaign, by Ed Crane (Communications Director), Dec 1980
    with Chris Hocker (National Coordinator)
    "The Clark Master Plan identified ... corollary goals ...: 'Attain a balance-of-power position in the 1980 Presidential Election; that is, garner more votes than are likely to decide the election.' The level of success in reaching this goal is again one of degree. Clark came nowhere near attaining the balance of power in the national popular vote, of course. ... it could be described as 'a' balance of power position, but not 'the' balance of power position."

    Books Authored

    A New Beginning, Aug 1980
    Introduction by Eugene McCarthy

    The introductory paragraph uses material from a Wikipedia article, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.