Freedom to engage in acts injurious to one's self or one's property

Articles

Libertarianism Is the Key to Our Future, by Jacob G. Hornberger, Future of Freedom, Jul 2006
Examines three reasons (freedom, morality and pragmatism) that suggest that Americans will eventually return to their libertarian heritage
"Here is the controlled-society argument with respect to morality: Your American ancestors didn't believe in drug laws, which means that they favored the use of harmful substances. Many of them abused their freedom by ingesting alcohol, cocaine, marijuana, and other harmful drugs. To do such things to one's body is immoral. The federal government, consisting of democratically elected public officials, used the power of the government to stamp out such immorality."
Liberty Defined, by Floyd A. 'Baldy' Harper, 4 Sep 1957
Speech to the Mont Pelerin Society; Harper first offers his definition of liberty, then explores "adulterated" definitions, its relation to morals, moral law and basic humans rights, ending with his hope for the cause of liberty
"A person cannot do right except in a situation where there is also the option of doing wrong. In other words, moral considerations have no place except where liberty exists. ... It follows, then, that no problem of morals can ever be resolved by removing liberty, in a degree either large or small."
The War on Drugs: Seen vs. the Unseen, by Angela Dills, 26 Oct 2015
Discusses the drug war in the context of Bastiat's essay "What is Seen and What is Unseen"
"People do things every day that I would not choose to do, many of which I think are unwise. They sky-dive, bungee-jump, and spend large sums on a designer pair of shoes. They tattoo and pierce their body, gamble in Las Vegas, and spend hours eating potato chips and watching TV. And they drink, smoke, and consume drugs. Many people engage in these activities without significant harm to themselves and with much enjoyment. Others find themselves suffering the consequences of unwise choices. Either way, as adults, it ought to be legal for them to do so and to experience the benefits and consequences of their choices."
Related Topics: Prohibition, War on Drugs
Vices Are Not Crimes: A Vindication of Moral Liberty, by Lysander Spooner, Mar 1875
Contrasts crimes and vices, discussing the need to legislate or take other governmental action against the former but not the latter, countering several potential arguments in favor of vice legislation, in particular laws regarding spirituous liquors
"Vices are those acts by which a man harms himself or his property. Crimes are those acts by which one man harms the person or property of another. Vices are simply the errors which a man makes in his search after his own happiness. Unlike crimes, they imply no malice toward others, and no interference with their persons or property. "

Books

Ain't Nobody's Business If You Do: The Absurdity of Consensual Crimes in Our Free Country, by Peter McWilliams, 1993
Electronic text available at author's site
Defending the Undefendable: The Pimp, Prostitute, Scab, Slumlord, Libeler, Moneylender, and Other Scapegoats in the Rogue's Gallery of American Society
    by Walter Block, 1976

Videos

Liberty & Virtue, by James Otteson, 29 Jun 2011
Explains why virtuous behaviour presupposes freely taken or uncoerced decisions
"So the question is if people begin to behave in the way that we would like them to behave ... as a result of our pushing them ever so slightly, maybe just nudging them ... are they virtuous? Well my argument is that, no. If a person makes a choice because he or she is being pushed in that direction, that's not a virtuous choice, because virtue requires having freely chosen the behavior. Coerced behavior or even just nudged behavior, to the extent that the person is not completely free in choosing, to that same extent the person is no longer capable of acting virtuously."
Related Topic: Aristotle