1995 movie that recounts the story of William Wallace

Braveheart is a 1995 American epic war film directed by Mel Gibson, who stars as William Wallace, a late 13th-century Scottish warrior who led the Scots in the First War of Scottish Independence against King Edward I of England. The film also stars Sophie Marceau, Patrick McGoohan and Catherine McCormack. The story is inspired by Blind Harry's epic poem The Actes and Deidis of the Illustre and Vallyeant Campioun Schir William Wallace and was adapted for the screen by Randall Wallace.

Cast and Crew

Mel GibsonWilliam Wallace
Patrick McGoohanKing Edward I, Longshanks
Mel GibsonDirector

Video Products

Braveheart [Blu-ray], 1 Sep 2009
Braveheart (Two-Disc Special Collector's Edition), 18 Dec 2007
Braveheart Widescreen Collection, 8 Jan 2002

Articles

Freedom's Flicks: The 20 Best Libertarian Movies of all Time, Nov 1999
The Orange County Register picks movies for "freedom lovers"
"3. Braveheart (1995). Mel Gibson plays William Wallace, who leads the Scots in their fight against British tyranny. Best libertarian moment: As his torturer begins the fatal evisceration, Wallace shouts out one last word before he dies: 'Freeeeeedommmmm!'"
The Critical Dilemma Facing Pro-War Libertarians, by Jacob Hornberger, 14 Feb 2007
Discusses the contradictions faced by U.S. libertarians and conservatives who endorsed or encouraged imperial and interventionist foreign policies
"Recall the movie Braveheart, which depicted the period in English history when the English king and his minions possessed and exercised the right to rape a newlywed bride on her wedding night. Can anyone imagine the woman's husband exclaiming, as his wife was carted away, 'At least we can peacefully protest the king's actions without being thrown into jail'?"

Cartoons and Comic Strips

Aargh! Blast this stupid game!, by Parker and Hart, The Wizard of Id, 16 Jul 2009

Videos


Braveheart, 24 May 1995
Includes AFI-nominated quote: "They may take away our lives, but they'll never take our freedom!"

The introductory paragraph uses material from the Wikipedia article "Braveheart" as of 08 Oct 2018, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.