The Big Apple

The City of New York, often called New York City (NYC) or simply New York (NY), is the most populous city in the United States. With an estimated 2017 population of 8,622,698 distributed over a land area of about 784 kmĀ², New York City is also the most densely populated major city in the United States. Located at the southern tip of the state of New York, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass and one of the world's most populous megacities, with an estimated 20,320,876 people in its 2017 Metropolitan Statistical Area and 23,876,155 residents in its Combined Statistical Area. A global power city, New York City has been described uniquely as the cultural, financial and media capital of the world, and exerts a significant impact upon commerce, entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, art, fashion and sports. The city's fast pace has inspired the term New York minute. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy.

Birthplace of

Walter Block, in Brooklyn, on 21 Aug 1941
Harry Browne, Harry Edson Browne, on 17 Jun 1933
William Henry Chamberlin, in Brooklyn, on 17 Feb 1897
Frank Chodorov, Fishel Chodorowsky, on 15 Feb 1887
Richard Ebeling, on 1950
Milton Friedman, in Brooklyn, on 31 Jul 1912
John Jay, on 12 Dec 1745
Leonard Liggio, in The Bronx, on 5 Jul 1933
Patrick McGoohan, in Astoria, on 19 Mar 1928
Robert Nozick, in Brooklyn, on 16 Nov 1938
Ralph Raico, in East Harlem, on 23 Oct 1936
George Reisman, George Gerald Reisman, on 13 Jan 1937
Murray Rothbard, Murray Newton Rothbard, in Bronx, on 2 Mar 1926
Joan Kennedy Taylor, in Manhattan, on 21 Dec 1926
Robert Anton Wilson, in Brooklyn, on 18 Jan 1932

Deathplace of

Frank Chodorov, on 28 Dec 1966
William Lloyd Garrison, on 24 May 1879
Henry George, on 29 Oct 1897
Ludwig von Mises, on 10 Oct 1973
Thomas Paine, in Greenwich Village, on 8 Jun 1809
Ayn Rand, on 6 Mar 1982
Murray Rothbard, on 7 Jan 1995
Joan Kennedy Taylor, on 29 Oct 2005

Conferences and Conventions

Manhattan Libertarian Party, Manhattan Libertarian Party Anual Convention, in Manhattan, on 21 Jan 2006

Articles

UpdJane Jacobs: The Spontaneity of Cities, by Sheldon Richman, Future of Freedom, Jul 2006
Memorial commentary, in particular about Jacob's books against urban planning and about her activism
"Here's a characteristic passage, illustrating how in a functioning city, strangers look out for other strangers as a matter of course: 'A lively street always has both its users and pure watchers. Last year I was on such a street in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, waiting for a bus. I had not been there longer than a minute ... a woman who opened a window on the third floor ... shouted down, "The bus doesn't run here on Saturdays!" ... This woman was one of thousands upon thousands of people in New York who casually take care of the streets. They notice strangers. They observe what's going on. ...'"
Related Topic: Jane Jacobs
Leonard Read, the Founder and Builder, by Mary Sennholz, The Freeman, May 1996
Biographical essay written by Read's secretary in the early days of FEE, as well as author of Leonard E. Read : Philosopher of Freedom
"The founders were convinced that New York City, with its splendid education and financial facilities, provided the ideal setting for FEE. But rent control had created a painful shortage of office space while confiscatory income and estate taxation had forced luxury homes and mansions to the market, which were now being sold at fractions of their original construction costs."
New York Politics '93, by Murray Rothbard, The Rothbard-Rockwell Report, Aug 1993
Discusses the potential outcome of the 1993 New York City Mayoral race between David Dinkins and Rudolph Giuliani, plus a cast of others
"New York is of course a famously left-wing city ... But while the city may be overwhelmingly leftist and Democratic, a complicating factor is race. New York has always been a hotbed of ethnic and racial conflict, but in the days of the old-time political bosses, the guys in the smoke-filled rooms could come out with electoral tickets that were carefully racially and ethnically balanced."
Samuel Edward Konkin III, by Jeff Riggenbach, 29 Jul 2010
Biographical essay; including examination of Konkin's ideas on the Counter-Economy; transcript of "The Libertarian Tradition" podcast of 20 July 2010
"Libertarians tended to gravitate toward certain metropolitan areas. New York was the major center of libertarian social and intellectual activity until sometime in the early 1970s, when the focus of the movement shifted to Los Angeles. ... Back in Madison, [Konkin] schemed on how to get to New York, where he could build his new relationship with Rothbard and attend Mises's famous seminar at New York University. He transferred to NYU in the fall term of 1970. ... There was much going on in Manhattan in the early '70s, much libertarian ferment and growth. ... There were talks, parties, gatherings of every kind."
Security Cameras' Slippery Slope, by Gene Healy, The Washington Examiner, 11 May 2010
Discusses the use of surveillance cameras in New York City, in London and elsewhere in the United Kingdom and in the United States, as well as drones by British police
"Times Square has 82 police surveillance cameras, but when jihadist Faisal Shahazad tried to set off a car bomb there May 1, they were no help in catching him. ... That failure hasn't cooled public officials' camera craze, however. New York Police Department Commissioner Raymond Kelly wants an electronic eye on every block from Central Park to 34th Street, and New York Sen. Charles Schumer demanded $30 million from the feds to help complete the Lower Manhattan Security Initiative, which includes a centralized camera network based on London's 'Ring of Steel.'"
The Disastrous World of the New York Subway, Part 1, by Gregory Bresiger, Future of Freedom, Feb 2006
"This reminds me of a ... trip a few months ago. At Jackson Heights, the train, which was supposed to be an express but had been going local, suddenly stopped for a public debate that didn't amuse weary riders coming home from work: the conductor and the motorman had started arguing over the public address system."
The Disastrous World of the New York Subway, Part 2, by Gregory Bresiger, Future of Freedom, Mar 2006
"So, depending on how you measure it, the Second Avenue subway is either 50 or 60 years behind schedule. And a month or so ago, voters approved a new $2.9 billion bond referendum to build — you guessed it! — the Second Avenue subway. Yet the Second Avenue subway is today no closer to a reality than, say, the MTA is to cutting subway fares ..."
The Disastrous World of the New York Subway, Part 3, by Gregory Bresiger, Future of Freedom, Apr 2006
"New York City's mayor, Michael Bloomberg, like so many other politicians before him, is angry with the transit workers' union. He's safe. He doesn't have to ride the subways. He can always blame government authorities or someone else for the dreadful state of the trains. It's a common strategy whenever things go wrong in government."

Videos


Ron Paul NYC Meetup Group at the NRA, 26 Sep 2007
Big Apple Friends of the NRA dinner at the Masonic Temple, 71 West 23rd Street

The introductory paragraph uses material from the Wikipedia article "New York City" as of 05 Oct 2018, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.